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We value your feedback and encourage questions, comments, or suggestions about our products. You can contact us by completing the online support request form, emailing [email protected], or calling 1300 901 001.Thank you for your continued support.- where can i buy female viagra Joint communique - 17 August, 2020. To support those people most at risk from COVID-19, the rollout of electronic prescriptions across Greater Melbourne will be expanded beyond the current communities of interest. This follows successful where can i buy female viagra testing since May 2020. Electronic prescribing is being implemented in General Practices and Community Pharmacies across Australia.

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With an immediate focus on general practices and community pharmacies in greater metropolitan Melbourne to substantially increase electronic prescription capability over the coming weeks we all need to work together. The following steps will help your pharmacy or general practice get ready.General practice and pharmacy readiness.Step 1 where can i buy female viagra. Software activation - contact your software supplier and ask them to activate your electronic prescribing functionality.Step 2. Communication between local pharmacies and general practices is critical - this will ensure everyone is ready to write and dispense an electronic prescription (noting where can i buy female viagra some pharmacies may require more time and resources to get their dispensing workflow ready).Patients may experience a delay in accessing their medicines including having to return to general practice for a paper prescription if this step is not undertaken.Step 3. Stay informed - attend webinars and education sessions run by the Australian Digital Health Agency, the Pharmacy Guild and the RACGP to learn more about electronic prescribing and how it works.Practices and pharmacies in other areas of Australia are being advised to prepare for a broader rollout by getting software ready and participating in training opportunities being provided by the Agency, peak bodies and software providers.

Schedule 8 and 4D medicinesAll medicines, including Schedule 8 and 4D medicines, can be prescribed and dispensed through an where can i buy female viagra electronic prescription providing patients with a safe and secure way of obtaining medicines remotely. Unlike a request for a Schedule 8 or 4D medicine using a digital image prescription via fax or email, the prescriber is not required to send an original hard copy of the prescription to the pharmacy - the electronic (paperless) prescription is the legal order to prescribe and supply.Patient ChoiceIt’s important to remember that electronic prescriptions are an alternative to paper. If a patient’s where can i buy female viagra preferred local pharmacy is not ready for electronic prescriptions, patients can still choose to get a paper prescription from their doctor.ResourcesFor more information about electronic prescribing and electronic prescriptions, see:Department of HealthAustralian Digital Health AgencyAustralian Digital Health Agency electronic prescription eLearningAustralian Digital Health Agency electronic prescription upcoming webinarsThe RACGP information for GP’s and patientsPharmaceutical Society of Australia Dedicated Electronic Prescriptions Support Line for pharmacies:1300 955 162. Available 08:30am to 7:00pm AESTMedia contactAustralian Digital Health Agency Media TeamMobile. 0428 772 where can i buy female viagra 421Email.

[email protected] About the Australian Digital Health AgencyThe Agency is tasked with improving health outcomes for all Australians through the delivery of digital healthcare systems, and implementing Australia’s National Digital Health Strategy – Safe, Seamless, and Secure. Evolving health and care to meet the needs of modern Australia in collaboration where can i buy female viagra with partners across the community. The Agency is the System Operator of My Health Record, and provides leadership, coordination, and delivery of a collaborative and innovative approach to utilising technology to support and enhance a clinically safe and connected national health system. These improvements will give individuals more control of their health and their health information, and support healthcare providers to where can i buy female viagra deliver informed healthcare through access to current clinical and treatment information. Further information.

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As flu what does viagra do to men season creeps up on the Northern Hemisphere, cold and flu relief medications will inevitably fly off store shelves. A natural remedy that shoppers might reach for is elderberry, a small, blackish-purple fruit that companies turn into syrups, lozenges and gummies. Though therapeutic uses of the berry date back centuries, Michael Macknin, a pediatrician at the Cleveland Clinic, hadn’t heard of using elderberry what does viagra do to men to treat the flu until a patient’s mother asked him about it.

Some industry-sponsored research claims that the herbal remedy could cut the length of the symptoms by up to four days. For a comparison, Tamiflu, an FDA-approved treatment, only reduces flu duration by about a single day what does viagra do to men. €œI said, 'Gee, if that’s really true [about elderberry], it would be a huge benefit,'” Macknin says.

But the effectiveness and safety of elderberry is still fairly unclear. Unlike the over-the-counter medicines what does viagra do to men at your local pharmacy, elderberry hasn't been through rigorous FDA testing and approval. However, Macknin and his team recently published a study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, which found that elderberry treatments did nothing for flu patients.

This prompts what does viagra do to men a need for further studies into the remedy — work that unfortunately stands a low chance of happening in the future, Macknin says. Looking For ProofElderberries are full of chemicals that could be good for your health. Like similar fruits, the berries contain high levels of antioxidants, compounds that what does viagra do to men shut down reactions in our bodies that damage cells.

But whether or not elderberry's properties also help immune systems fend off a virus is murky. There are only a handful of studies that have examined if elderberries reduced the severity or duration of the flu. And though some of the work prior to Macknin’s was well-designed and supported this herbal remedy as a helpful flu aid, at least some — and potentially all — of those studies were funded by elderberry treatment manufacturers.Macknin says an elderberry supplement company provided his team with their products and a placebo version for free, but that the company wasn’t involved in the research what does viagra do to men beyond that.

Macknin's study is the largest one conducted on elderberry to date, with 87 influenza patients completing the entire treatment course. Participants in the study were also welcome to take Tamiflu, what does viagra do to men for ethical reasons, as the team didn’t want to exclude anyone from taking a proven flu therapy. Additionally, each participant took home either a bottle of elderberry syrup or the placebo with instructions on when and how to take it.

The research team called participants every day for a symptom check and to remind them to take their medication.By chance, it what does viagra do to men turned out that a higher percentage of the patients given elderberry syrup had gotten their flu shot and also chose to take Tamiflu. Since the vaccination can reduce the severity of infection in recipients who still come down with the flu, the study coincidentally operated in favor of those who took the herbal remedy, Macknin says. Those patients could have dealt with a shorter, less-intense illness because of the Tamiflu and vaccination.

€œEverything was stacked to have it turn out better [for the elderberry group],” Macknin says, “and it turned out the same.” The researchers found no what does viagra do to men difference in illness duration or severity between the elderberry and placebo groups. While analyzing the data, the team also found that those on the herbal treatment might have actually fared worse than those on the placebo. The potential for this intervention to actually harm instead of help influenza patients explains why Macknin thinks the therapy needs further research.But, don't expect that work to happen any time soon what does viagra do to men.

Researchers are faced with a number of challenges when it comes to studying the efficacy of herbal remedies. For starters, there's little financial what does viagra do to men incentive to investigate if they actually work. Plant products are challenging to patent, making them less lucrative prospects for pharmaceutical companies or research organizations to investigate.

Additionally, investigations that try and prove a proposed therapy as an effective drug — like the one Macknin and his team accomplished — are expensive, Macknin says. Those projects need FDA oversight what does viagra do to men and additional paperwork, components that drive up study costs. €œIt’s extraordinarily expensive and there’s no money in it for anybody,” Macknin says.Talk To Your DoctorUltimately, research on elderberry therapies for flu patients is a mixed bag, and deserves more attention from scientists.

However, if you still want to discuss elderberry treatments for the flu with your doctor, that’s a conversation you should feel comfortable having, says Erica McIntyre, an expert focused on health and environmental psychology in the School of Public Health at what does viagra do to men the University of Technology Sydney. Navigating what research says about a particular herbal medicine is challenging for patients and health practitioners alike. The process is made more complex what does viagra do to men by the range of similar-sounding products on the market that lack standardized ingredients, McIntyre says.

But when doctors judge or shame patients for asking about non-conventional healthcare interventions, the response can distance people and push them closer to potentially unproven treatments. Even worse, those individuals might start to keep their herbal remedies a secret. €œIt is that fear about being judged for what does viagra do to men use of that medication,” McIntyre says, that drives up to 50 percent of people taking herbal treatments to withhold that information from healthcare practitioners.

That’s a dangerous choice, as some herbal and traditional medications can interact and cause health problems.If a physician shames someone for asking about alternative medicines, it’s likely time to find a new doctor, McIntyre says. Look for someone who will listen to your concerns — what does viagra do to men whether it's that you feel traditional treatments haven’t worked for you, or that you didn’t like the side effects, the two common reasons people pursue herbal treatments in the first place. €œYou’re not necessarily looking for a doctor that will let you do whatever you want,” McIntyre says, “but that they actually consider you as a patient, your treatment choices and your treatment priorities, and communicate in a way that’s supportive.” And if a doctor suggests that you avoid a treatment you’re interested in, ask why.

They generally have a good reason, McIntyre says.For now, know that even if your doctor doesn’t support you taking elderberry, there are other proven preventative measures that are worth your while — like the flu shot. Anyone six months what does viagra do to men or older should get it, Macknin says, and stick to the protocols we’re used to following to prevent COVID-19 infections, like social distancing, mask-wearing and hand-washing. Those measures also help prevent flu transmission, too — something, so far, no elderberry supplement package can claim.The yearly influenza season threatens to make the COVID-19 pandemic doubly deadly, but I believe that this isn’t inevitable.There are two commonly given vaccines – the pneumococcal vaccine and the Hib vaccine – that protect against bacterial pneumonias.

These bacteria complicate both influenza what does viagra do to men and COVID-19, often leading to death. My examination of disease trends and vaccination rates leads me to believe that broader use of the pneumococcal and Hib vaccines could guard against the worst effects of a COVID-19 illness.I am an immunologist and physiologist interested in the effects of combined infections on immunity. I have reached my what does viagra do to men insight by juxtaposing two seemingly unrelated puzzles.

Infants and children get SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, but very rarely become hospitalized or die. And case numbers and death rates from COVID-19 began varying greatly from nation to nation and city to city even before lockdowns began. I wondered why.One night what does viagra do to men I woke up with a possible answer.

Vaccination rates. Most children, beginning at age what does viagra do to men two months, are vaccinated against numerous diseases. Adults less so.

And, both infant and what does viagra do to men adult vaccination rates vary widely across the world. Could differences in the rates of vaccination against one or more diseases account for differences in COVID-19 risks?. As someone who had previously investigated other pandemics such as the Great Flu Pandemic of 1918-19 and AIDS, and who has worked with vaccines, I had a strong background for tracking down the relevant data to test my hypothesis.Pneumococcal Vaccination Rates Correlate With Lower COVID-19 Cases and DeathsI gathered national and some local data on vaccination rates against influenza, polio, measles-mumps-rubella (MMR), diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP), tuberculosis (BCG), pneumococci and Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib).

I correlated them with COVID-19 case rates and death what does viagra do to men rates for 24 nations that had experienced their COVID-19 outbreaks at about the same time. I controlled for factors such as percentage of the population who were obese, diabetic or elderly.I found that only pneumococcal vaccines afforded statistically significant protection against COVID-19. Nations such as Spain, Italy, Belgium, Brazil, Peru and Chile that have the highest what does viagra do to men COVID-19 rates per million have the poorest pneumococcal vaccination rates among both infants and adults.

Nations with the lowest rates of COVID-19 – Japan, Korea, Denmark, Australia and New Zealand – have the highest rates of pneumococcal vaccination among both infants and adults.A recent preprint study (not yet peer-reviewed) from researchers at the Mayo Clinic has also reported very strong associations between pneumococcal vaccination and protection against COVID-19. This is especially true among minority patients who are bearing the what does viagra do to men brunt of the coronavirus pandemic. The report also suggests that other vaccines, or combinations of vaccines, such as Hib and MMR may also provide protection.These results are important because in the U.S., childhood vaccination against pneumococci – which protects against Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria – varies by state from 74% to 92%.

Although the CDC recommends that all adults 18-64 in high risk groups for COVID-19 and all adults over the age of 65 get a pneumococcal vaccination, only 23% of high-risk adults and 64% of those over the age of 65 do so.Similarly, although the CDC recommends at all infants and some high-risk adults be vaccinated against Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib), only 80.7% of children in the U.S. And a what does viagra do to men handful of immunologically compromised adults have been. Pneumococcal and Hib vaccination rates are significantly lower in minority populations in the U.S.

And in countries that have been hit harder by COVID-19 than the U.S.Based on these data, I advocate universal pneumococcal and Hib vaccination among children, at-risk adults and all adults over what does viagra do to men 65 to prevent serious COVID-19 disease.Left. Combined rates of childhood and adult (over 65) pneumococcal vaccination (out of a possible 200). Right.

Cases (per million) population of COVID-19 at about 90 days into the pandemic for 24 nations. Nations with high pneumococcal vaccination rates have low COVID-19 case rates. (Credit.

CC BY-SA)How Pneumococcal Vaccination Protects Against COVID-19Protection against serious COVID-19 disease by pneumococcal and Hib vaccines makes sense for several reasons. First, recent studies reveal that the majority of hospitalized COVID-19 patients, and in some studies nearly all, are infected with streptococci, which causes pneumococcal pneumonias, Hib or other pneumonia-causing bacteria. Pneumococcal and Hib vaccinations should protect coronavirus patients from these infections and thus significantly cut the risk of serious pneumonia.I also found that pneumococcal, Hib and possibly rubella vaccines may confer specific protection against the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19 by means of “molecular mimicry.”Molecular mimicry occurs when the immune system thinks one microbe looks like another.

In this case, proteins found in pneumococcal vaccines and, to a lesser degree, ones found in Hib and rubella vaccines as well look like several proteins produced by the SARS-CoV-2 virus.Two of these proteins found in pneumococcal vaccines mimic the spike and membrane proteins that permit the virus to infect cells. This suggests pneumococcal vaccination may prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection. Two other mimics are the nucleoprotein and replicase that control virus replication.

These proteins are made after viral infection, in which case pneumococcal vaccination may control, but not prevent, SARS-CoV-2 replication.Either way, these vaccines may provide proxy protection against SARS-CoV-2 infection that we can implement right now, even before we have a specific virus vaccine. Such protection may not be complete. People might still suffer a weakened version of COVID-19 but, like most infants and children, be protected against the worst effects of the infection.Fighting Influenza-related Pneumonias During the COVID-19 PandemicWhile the specific protection these other vaccines confer against COVID-19 has not yet been tested in a clinical trial, I advocate broader implementation of pneumococcal and Hib vaccination for one additional, well-validated reason.Pneumococcal and Hib pneumonias – both caused by bacteria – are the major causes of death following viral influenza.

The influenza virus rarely causes death directly. Most often, the virus makes the lungs more susceptible to bacterial pneumonias, which are deadly. Dozens of studies around the world have demonstrated that increasing rates of pneumococcal and Hib vaccination dramatically lowers influenza-related pneumonias.Similar studies demonstrate that the price of using these vaccines is balanced by savings due to lower rates of influenza-related hospitalizations, intensive care unit admissions and deaths.

In the context of COVID-19, lowering rates of influenza-related hospitalizations and ICU admissions would free up resources to fight the coronavirus, independent of any effect these vaccines might have on SARS-CoV-2 itself. In my opinion, that is a winning scenario.In short, we need not wait for a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine to slow down COVID-19.I believe that we can and should act now by fighting the coronavirus with all the tools at our disposal, including influenza, Hib, pneumococcal and perhaps rubella vaccinations.Preventing pneumococcal and Hib complications of influenza and COVID-19, and perhaps proxy-vaccinating against SARS-CoV-2 itself, helps everyone. Administering these already available and well-tested pneumococcal and Hib vaccines to people will save money by freeing up hospital beds and ICUs.

It will also improve public health by reducing the spread of multiple infections and boost the economy by nurturing a healthier population.Robert Root-Bernstein is a Professor of Physiology at Michigan State University. This article was originally published on The Conversation under a Creative Commons liscense Read the original here.This story appeared in the November 2020 issue as "Bacteria and the Brain." Subscribe to Discover magazine for more stories like this.It’s not always easy to convince people that the human gut is a sublime and wondrous place worthy of special attention. Sarkis Mazmanian discovered that soon after arriving at Caltech for his first faculty job 14 years ago, when he explained to a local artist what he had in mind for the walls outside his new office.The resulting mural greets visitors to the Mazmanian Lab today.

A vaguely psychedelic, 40-foot-long, tube-shaped colon that’s pink, purple and red snakes down the hallway. In a panel next to it, fluorescent yellow and green bacteria explode out of a deeply inflamed section of the intestinal tract, like radioactive lava from outer space.The mural is modest compared with what the scientist has been working on since. Over the last decade or so, Mazmanian has been a leading proponent of the idea that the flora of the human digestive tract has a far more powerful effect on the human body and mind than we thought — a scientific effort that earned him a $500,000 MacArthur Fellowship “Genius Grant” in 2012.

Since then, Mazmanian and a small but growing cadre of fellow microbiologists have amassed a tantalizing body of evidence on the microbiome’s role in all kinds of brain disorders, including schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and depression.But the results they’ve seen in autism could, in the end, prove the most transformative. Autism affects about 1 in 59 children in the U.S., and involves profound social withdrawal, communication problems, and sometimes anxiety and aggression. The causes of the brain disorder have remained speculative.

Now, Mazmanian and other researchers are finding that autism may be inextricably linked to — or even caused by — irregularities in the gut microbiome.A Biology StoryAt 47, Mazmanian — with his shaved head, flannel shirt and skinny jeans — resembles a young, urban hipster on his way to write at the local café. Originally, literary life was his plan. Born in Lebanon to two Armenian refugees, neither of whom had more than a first-grade education, Mazmanian landed in the class of an energetic high school English teacher in California’s San Fernando Valley, where his family first settled.

The teacher recognized his gift for language and encouraged him to pursue a career in literature. Mazmanian enrolled at UCLA in 1990, planning to major in English.Everything changed when he took his first biology class. Hunched over his new, thick textbook in the library, reading about basic biological concepts like photosynthesis, Mazmanian felt a vast new world opening up to him.Sarkis Mazmanian, shown in front of a mural that celebrates the human gut, is part of a group of microbiologists researching the effects of the digestive tract on a range of disorders.

(Credit. Caltech)“For the first time in my life, I wanted to turn the page and see where the story was going to go,” he says. €œI think I decided that minute to become a scientist.”Mazmanian was most fascinated by the idea that tiny organisms, invisible to the naked eye, could function as powerful, self-contained machines — powerful enough to take over and destroy the human body.

After graduating with a degree in microbiology, Mazmanian joined a UCLA infectious diseases lab and began studying bacteria that cause staph infections.As his dissertation defense approached, Mazmanian read a one-page commentary penned by a prominent microbiologist, highlighting the fact that our intestines are teeming with hundreds, if not thousands, of different species of bacteria. But it was still largely unknown what they are and how they affect the human body.When Mazmanian dug further, he found that no one had yet answered what seemed to him to be the most obvious question. Why would the human immune system, designed to attack and destroy foreign invaders, allow hundreds of species of bacteria to live and thrive in our guts unmolested?.

To him, the bacteria’s survival implied that we had evolved to coexist with them. And if that were so, he reasoned, there must be some benefit to both the microbes and the human body — a symbiotic relationship. But what was it?.

Gut InvadersMazmanian set out to study the link between gut microbes and the immune system. As a postdoctoral researcher, he joined the lab of Harvard University infectious disease specialist Dennis Kasper.To start, Mazmanian examined how the immune systems of germ-free mice — lab mice completely protected, starting at birth, from all microbes — differed from those of mice with either few or normal levels of microbes. He expected this initial census would be just a first step in a long and arduous quest for scientific pay dirt.

But when he went to examine a printout of his results in the lab, he realized immediately he might already be onto something big. The germ-free mice had a 30 to 40 percent reduction in a specific type of immune cell known as helper T-cells.This colorized close-up of a mouse’s gut reveals the tight relationship between the gut microbe Bacteroides fragilis (red) and the epithelial surface of the colon (blue). (Credit.

Caltech)Since helper T-cells play a key role in coordinating attacks against invading pathogens, the finding suggested that the immune systems of the germ-free mice were far less robust than those found in peers with normal levels of microbes.“That was exciting, right?. € Mazmanian recalls. €œObviously I repeated it and tested it in a number of different ways.

Then I asked the next question. €˜Can I restore the [immune] function in an adult animal?. €™â€‰â€Mazmanian colonized the guts of the immunocompromised, germ-free mice with microbes from standard lab mice.

After receiving the fecal transplant, their T-cell counts shot up. Within a month, their numbers were identical to mice raised outside the germ-free bubble.Resolving to identify the microorganisms causing this transformation, Mazmanian resorted to trial and error. One by one, he added strains of bacteria found in the guts of mice to the guts of germ-free mice.He got nowhere with the first five or six species he examined.

Then, simply because it was convenient, he decided to test one more that was readily available in his lab. Mazmanian’s adviser, Kasper, had been studying a gut microbe called Bacteroides fragilis. When Mazmanian implanted one of Kasper’s specimens into the gut of his germ-free mice, the results were dramatic.

The T-cell numbers spiked to normal. Eventually, Mazmanian demonstrated he could reproduce this effect simply by adding a single molecule that these bacteria produce, called polysaccharide A, to their guts.“There was no logic in the choice whatsoever,” Mazmanian recalls. €œ[B.

Fragilis] was available, it came from the gut.” In other words, he got lucky.Mazmanian dug deeper and discovered that the biggest impact B. Fragilis had was on the population of a subtype of helper T-cells called regulatory, or suppressor, T-cells. These cells play a key role in preventing the immune system from attacking its host body, protecting against autoimmune or inflammatory diseases.

It was the first time any scientist had demonstrated that a single compound from a single microbe could reverse a specific problem with the immune system.To Mazmanian, the finding, published in 2005 in the journal Cell, alluded to new approaches to treating a wide array of autoimmune, inflammatory and allergic disorders. What if it were possible to help a faulty immune system by tweaking a patient’s microbiome?. It was with this exploration in mind that he arrived in Pasadena in 2006 to set up his lab at Caltech.A Convenient CollaborationA few years later, Mazmanian was having lunch on campus with neuroscientist and colleague Paul Patterson.

Patterson had been preoccupied with a mystery that had, for years, confounded those studying autism in humans. When pregnant mothers have a severe infection in the second trimester, their babies are much more likely to develop autism.As Mazmanian tells it, Patterson was a man of few words, and at lunch Mazmanian was “going on and on” about his own work.“You know,” Patterson interjected thoughtfully, “I think kids with autism have GI issues.”Patterson recalled reading that something like 60 percent of children with autism had some form of clinical GI problem, such as bloating, constipation, flatulence or diarrhea. Was it possible, he wondered, that there was a microbiome connection?.

As they talked, Mazmanian’s excitement grew.A few years earlier, Patterson had discovered that when he exposed pregnant mice to pathogens like the influenza virus, they gave birth to pups that grew up more likely to be startled by loud noises, to shy away from social contact and to groom themselves repetitively — symptoms that resemble those of autism. Patterson was in the process of comparing the brains of these autism-mimicking mice with their neurotypical cousins to see if he could detect any differences that might explain how the maternal immune system was somehow interfering with the pups’ brain development.Mazmanian had a suggestion. The next time Patterson sacrificed one of his autistic mice to study their brains, what if he set the intestines aside for his colleague down the hall?.

When the guts arrived in Mazmanian’s lab, he found that the intestines of the neurotypical mice looked normal. But the guts of the autism-mimicking offspring were almost uniformly inflamed. Could it be that the microbiome was the cause of this inflammation?.

And could that, in turn, be somehow connected to the behavioral symptoms?. Throughout the winter and spring of 2012, Mazmanian and Patterson continued their conversation. Mazmanian found distinct differences in the microbiomes of the mice.

And, they noticed, the mice with the features of autism had leaky gut syndrome, an increased permeability of the gut lining that can allow pathogens and allergens to leach out. This condition had also been reported in children with autism.So Mazmanian and Patterson turned their attention outside the gut. They took blood samples to see if any gut microbes, or the compounds they produce, were circulating in the rest of the body.

They homed in on one molecule in particular, called 4-ethylphenyl sulfate, which was roughly 45 times as abundant in the mice that had symptoms of autism. And it looked familiar. Structurally, it was almost identical to a molecule recently found to be significantly elevated in human children with autism.It was enough to take the next step.

Every day for three weeks, Mazmanian injected the molecule, harvested from the mice with autism-like symptoms, directly into the bloodstream of 5-week-old normal lab mice (the age at which the autistic mice normally developed leaky gut). Then Mazmanian and his team gave them a series of behavioral tests. The mice were far more easily startled and were less comfortable in large empty spaces than their untreated peers, indications of an increase in anxiety-related behaviors commonly seen in the mice with autism-like symptoms.

The researchers published their results in Cell in 2013.Though surprising, the data made sense in some ways. Many drug companies rely on small-molecule drugs that can be taken orally, but still manage to cross the blood-brain barrier and affect behavior. It seemed entirely possible that small molecules, created by bacteria in the gut, could enter the bloodstream and reach the brain.

And they don’t even have to leak out of the gut to do so.Of Mice and MenPatterson died in 2014, at age 70, just six months after the publication of the duo’s groundbreaking Cell paper. Around the same time, a series of parallel experiments in a clinic hundreds of miles away was already paving the way forward. While Patterson and Mazmanian had been working in mice, Rosa Krajmalnik-Brown, a microbiologist at Arizona State University, had teamed up with Jim Adams, who directs the university’s autism and Asperger’s research program, to study humans.The researchers were conducting a detailed analysis of the microbiome of human autism patients and found that the bacteria were far less diverse in the children with autism.

Notably, several important species involved in the digestion of carbohydrates were severely depleted.Krajmalnik-Brown and Adams launched a preliminary trial to test the effects of fecal transplants on 18 children between the ages of 7 and 16 with severe autism, who also had severe GI issues. The researchers administered powerful antibiotics to kill off the microbiomes of the children and followed them with a bowel cleanse. They then replaced the microbes with transplanted flora taken from the guts of healthy neurotypical adult volunteers.The results were better than anyone could have expected.

The procedure resulted in a large reduction in GI symptoms and increased the diversity of bacteria in the children’s guts. But more significantly, their neurological symptoms were reduced. At the onset of the study in 2017, an independent evaluator found 83 percent of participants had severe autism.

Two years after the initial trial, only 17 percent were rated as severely autistic. And 44 percent were no longer on the autism scale.“[My child] did a complete 180,” says Dana Woods, whose then-7-year-old son Ethan enrolled in the initial study five years ago. €œHis ability to communicate is so much different now.

He’s just so much more present. He’s so much more aware. He’s no longer in occupational therapy.

He’s no longer in speech therapy. After the study, he tested two points away from a neurotypical child.”In their first report on the trial in 2017, the team highlighted a number of distinct changes in the microbiome after the transplants, in particular a surge in the populations of three types of bacteria. Among them was a four-fold increase in Bifidobacterium, a probiotic organism that seems to play a key role in the maintenance of a healthy gut.But figuring out what was happening on a cellular level — to really look inside some guts — would require another vehicle.

The ASU team needed Mazmanian’s mice.“At the end of the day, what we care about is healing people and how the microbiome affects people,” explains Krajmalnik-Brown. €œThat’s why we work with people. But with mice you can do things that are more mechanistic.”The Great Mouse Detective(Credit.

Caltech)Together, Krajmalnik-Brown, Mazmanian and their collaborators would uncover some tantalizing new insights that go a long way to solving the mystery. In May 2019, the team published another high-profile paper in Cell, after they transplanted stool samples from Krajmalnik-Brown’s severely autistic patients into the guts of Mazmanian’s germ-free mice. The offspring of these mice showed the autism-like symptoms, such as repetitive and compulsive behavior.This time, the team dug even deeper into the biochemical processes playing out in the brain, looking not just at behavior but at the chemicals involved in creating it.

The mice that developed autism-like behaviors had measurably lower levels of two substances called taurine and 5-aminovaleric acid (5AV). When they dug into the literature, the team learned that these two substances are known to mimic activity of a key signaling agent in the brain called gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) — a neurotransmitter that other studies have found is deficient in the brains of children with autism.What’s more, some have speculated that the tendency of children with autism to experience sensory overstimulation may stem from the inability to tamp down overexcited neurons. A lack of GABA could lead to just that.The scientists next orally administered high levels of taurine and 5AV to pregnant mice with the autistic children’s microbiomes.

When their pups were born, the researchers continued to feed the young the substances until they reached adulthood. Compared with untreated animals, the second-generation mice had significantly fewer behavioral symptoms. Taurine reduced repetitive behavior, as measured by marble burying, increased the level of social interaction, and relieved anxiety.

Mice administered 5AV were more active and social.“We healed humans with behavioral problems,” says Krajmalnik-Brown. €œ[And we] transferred some of those deficits and behaviors to mice — basically the opposite. It’s huge.”Mazmanian hopes to take the next step in the months ahead.“I can flip a switch, turn on a light, I know that switch turns on that light.

I don’t know the circuit, I don’t know where the wire is,” Mazmanian says. €œExactly how that’s happening … we just don’t understand that.”This most recent study, by itself, hardly proves that dysregulated microbiomes cause the brain disorder — a point that plenty of other scientists skeptical of Mazmanian’s work are happy to make.“The paper made a big splash, but trying to model psychiatric-related human conditions in mice, in my view, is a little bit of a stretch,” says Sangram Sisodia, a neurobiologist at the University of Chicago who studies the microbiome. €œA mouse with autism?.

€Nor was that the only criticism. Several researchers have suggested that the group didn’t give proper attention to one of their tests ­— one whose results conflicted with their thesis ­— while others found flaws in the statistical methods they used to assess their results. Mazmanian downplays these criticisms, but agrees the work is not yet conclusive.Meanwhile, the ASU trial has also engendered skepticism, mainly due to its tiny sample size, the lack of a control group and the methods by which the children were assessed for autism severity.

Krajmalnik-Brown and Adams say they stand by their results, but agree more research is needed. In recent months, they have launched two new studies that will address these issues.Adams insists the work is already changing lives. €œWe followed up with every one of our 18 participants,” he says, referring to the children who received fecal transplants.

€œSure enough, we found that most of the GI benefits had remained. And family after family said their child just slowly, steadily continued making more improvement.” They published the update in Scientific Reports in spring 2019.“I’m not ready to say the case is closed,” says Mazmanian. €œHealthy skepticism is a good thing.

I believe the preclinical data, I believe the mouse data. But there’s a lot of studies that still need to be done.” A Healthy Gut, A New OutlookEthan Woods had GI issues and symptoms of autism until researchers introduced new microbes to his gut. His mother says the treatment changed everything.

(Credit. Dana Woods)Prior to his fecal transplant at age 7, Ethan Woods suffered from chronic and severe diarrhea, constipation and cramping, symptoms so extreme that to his mother, Dana, he sounded like “a bit like a woman in labor when he was trying to have a bowel movement.” “It was just awful watching your child go through this,” she says, explaining that when she enrolled her autistic son in the Arizona State study, her “only goal was to fix his gut.”Remarkably, Ethan’s agony began to disappear just a few weeks into the trial. But that was not the most dramatic difference.

Before the transplant, Ethan’s speech was drawn out and slow, his language skills rudimentary. He seemed to live in his own bubble. He had frequent outbursts.

For as long as Dana could remember, her mornings with Ethan had been marked by arguing, fighting, pushing and anger. But then one morning, something shocking happened.“He woke me up one morning with his face right in my face with this big smile and he said, ‘Morning, Mom!. €™â€‰â€ she recalls.

€œAnd he was just excited and happy and ready to go about his day with this big smile. It choked me up to the point where I teared up because I had never experienced a happy kid in the morning.”Later, Ethan carried over an iPad and opened an app with a talking cat that repeats back the words children speak aloud. He played back a video recording of himself from just a few weeks earlier.“[He] looks me in the eye and says, ‘Mom, why did I talk like that?.

What is wrong with me?. €™ And as soon as he did that, I caught my breath. I had to compose myself and say, ‘I don’t know.

But do you feel better?. Do you feel different?. Why do you think?.

€™â€‰â€Ethan’s communication skills had already begun to improve. Within a year of the study, his speech therapist graduated him from speech therapy because he had met all his goals.“He went from one end of the rainbow all the way to the other end of the rainbow,” she says. €œPrior to the study, I was very afraid.

My biggest fear was ‘how is he going to navigate the world when I’m not here?. €™ And I think I have a lot of hope now that he is going to be OK now on his own.”There’s something strange about the female orgasm, something that scientists have been unable to explain. Biological functions are normally discussed in terms of evolutionary pressure, or reproductive advantage.

If a biological trait improves your chances of having more offspring, then it’s more likely to stick around in your species. The male orgasm makes perfect sense — ejaculate contains the genetic material that’s necessary for making babies. But the female orgasm has been harder to nail down.

Fertilization doesn’t depend on it, and “fun” isn’t exactly in the pantheon of evolutionary explanations.Researchers that study how the female orgasm relates to reproductive success have two main options — either ask people invasive questions about their most personal moments, or to find a way to stick probes in or on them during said moments. Neither of these approaches have resulted in the kind of “wet lab” research that’s the gold standard for biological understanding.What we do know, despite widespread cultural discomfort with talking openly about sex and pleasure, is that there appears to be significant sexual dysfunction in American society. Back in 2014, researchers from the Kinsey Institute, the preeminent U.S.

Academy for the study of sex and relationships, said as much. In a survey of nearly 3,000 people, they found that men, straight or gay, orgasmed 85 percent of the time during consensual sexual encounters. Lesbian women orgasmed less often, 75 percent of the time, while straight women fared worst with just a 60 percent chance of orgasm.

Other studies have shown that something like 10-15 percent of women experience lifelong anorgasmia, meaning they’ve never experienced orgasm. A further 40 percent of women report some kind of inability to reach orgasm in the past year.The orgasm gap is hard to explain. Some think that it comes down to straight men’s finesse, or lack thereof, citing the difference between straight and lesbian satisfaction.

Indeed, it makes sense that knowing your way around the territory would help. But for many couples this isn’t a helpful revelation, since the emotional maturity necessary to teach sexual dexterity is often out of reach. Shortcut to SatisfactionLuckily, we live in an era of Silicon Valley disruption, which has even started lapping at the shores of sex research.

Technologist Liz Klinger is at the forefront of this transition. She and her team have built a platform that lets people become citizen scientists of sex —without ever having to get out from between the sheets.About a decade ago, Klinger’s company, Lioness, released what they billed as the first “smart vibrator,” a sex toy that could actually learn about you. The final product was a far cry from the first prototype, which was much more laboratory object than sex toy.The “test device was this whole mess of wires, with a hard connection.

We had to physically send it to our beta testers, who used it and sent it back,” recalls Klinger. The researchers would download the data collected by the toy’s four sensors — temperature, motion, acceleration and pressure — and compile it into a chart that represented arousal and orgasm, as told through the story of pelvic-floor muscle contractions.It was an immediate success for sex partners who needed ways to talk about pleasure in a more objective way. Klinger recalled that when she got the first beta-test couple on the phone, “the wife was like ‘holy crap, we finally were able to talk about these things that I’ve had a lot of trouble talking about.’ It turned out that she wanted more foreplay, and he didn’t know quite that that meant.

He’d spend more time, but it just didn’t match up, you know?. € With the company’s signature offering in hand — a chart of sexual arousal over time — Klinger found that couples could have a conversation “without the subtext of ‘oh, you’re not good enough, or I don’t like you enough,’ on the husband’s part and ‘I’m so tired of talking about this’ on the wife’s part,” she says. The chart “can change people’s perceptions of their own experiences, and how they talk about them with others.”Doing the Deed — For ScienceThis spring, the company has launched a research platform dubbed Lioness 2.0 — a new optional service that, unsurprisingly, their data-obsessed users have greeted with open arms.

Now, instead of simply using the toy to understand themselves better, Lioness owners can opt in to the kinds of hands-on studies that are necessary for a deeper understanding of sex and pleasure. So far, the company is working with Nigeria’s Society for Family Health to study how pleasure changes with menopause across age, race and orientation, as well as with the U.S.’s Center for Genital Health and Education to explore the role of pelvic floor muscles in orgasm.Pani Farvid, a professor of applied psychology at The New School in New York City, has some reservations about the platform. €œI really like what they’re trying to do, but there could be more added to make it a bit more comprehensive.

My concern is that there's a misconception that sex is just about the orgasm, that it’s just physiological and that pleasure just has to do with the genitals.” From where she’s sitting, “that’s a very mechanical view of sexuality.” If the Lioness is helping to equalize the orgasm gap, or helping people understand their bodies better, “I think that's great,” says Farvid. €œBut as a critical sexologist, I'm interested in delving deeper into what these practices mean.” If sex is hyper-focused on orgasm, to exclusion of everything else, she cautions that these norms “have real-life negative impacts on people's sex lives and their sense of themselves.”At this point, knee-deep in an era of data collection that was once the sole purview of white-coat-wearing scientists, it’s old news that we need to be careful with what our technology is doing to us. No tool can serve as a cure-all, even if it comes loaded with a neat app and some space-age sensors.

What it can offer, though, is the opportunity to start a conversation, and the chance to take a long, honest look at something about yourself — whether it’s the number of steps you take every day, or the way you want to be touched.Wondering how to keep your glasses from fogging up when your mask is on?. Look no further. If we've learned one thing throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, it's the importance of wearing a mask.

Countless studies have shown over the past eight months that wearing a protective barrier over your nose and mouth — whether it's a standard-issue surgical mask or an N95 respirator — can significantly decrease the odds of catching and transmitting disease. What's more, some research shows that masking up can reduce the severity of an infection if a masked person does contract COVID-19. But while masks are potentially lifesaving, they can be uncomfortable, often changing your breathing patterns and fogging up your glasses when breath escapes through the top of the mask.

Among people who choose not to wear a mask to prevent the spread of COVID-19, many cite discomfort as a key reason why.Wesley Wilson, a tumor immunologist in Pennsylvania, knows how annoying it can be when your glasses are fogging up. He says fogging is “definitely a problem” among his hospital colleagues, who need to wear protective goggles and surgical masks while on the job. Fortunately, they've also picked up a few helpful hacks for keeping their vision clear while wearing a mask with glasses.#1.

Use Tape“If you have to keep your mask on for hours, tape works like a charm,” Wilson says. This especially applies to healthcare professionals in his practice who are required to keep their masks on at all times, except during lunch. €œIf you're putting on your mask and taking it off a lot, tape probably isn't practical — but two small pieces of tape on the cheeks keep the mask fitted closer to your face, and the hot air out of your glasses,” he says.#2.

Fit the Mask to Your FaceWhile some air leakage is to be expected, wearing a mask that fits securely to your face will prevent glass fogging and filter the virus more effectively since less air is coming in or out. Find surgical masks or N95s that come with a nose bridge, a small, flexible piece of metal or plastic that allows the mask to more closely fit the contours of your face. Nose bridges can be sewn inside masks or affixed to the front.Read More.

Why It Feels Like You Can't Breathe Inside Your Face Mask#3. Adjust Your MaskAccording to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, a minor adjustment in how you wear your mask could be enough to prevent fog as well. Simply pull the mask over your nose and rest your glasses on top of your face mask.

As long as the mask is fitted close to your face, this should prevent hot air from slipping out.#4. Spray Your GlassesA former ice hockey player, Wilson says the protective visor under his helmet would often fog with hot air while he was on the ice during games. Like an ocean diver, he would use de-misting solution or a defogging spray (such as this one) to keep his visor free of fog.

The same concept applies to eyeglass fog caused by masking, he says. €œYou can either buy a spray or you can make your own with either shaving cream or soap and water,” says Wilson. €œWiping some shaving cream on your glasses and then wiping it off will coat them with a similar surface-tension altering compound that prevents fog.”.

As flu season creeps up on the Northern Hemisphere, cold and where can i buy female viagra flu relief medications will inevitably fly off store shelves. A natural remedy that shoppers might reach for is elderberry, a small, blackish-purple fruit that companies turn into syrups, lozenges and gummies. Though therapeutic uses of the berry date back centuries, Michael Macknin, a pediatrician at the Cleveland Clinic, hadn’t heard of using elderberry to treat the flu until a patient’s where can i buy female viagra mother asked him about it. Some industry-sponsored research claims that the herbal remedy could cut the length of the symptoms by up to four days.

For a comparison, Tamiflu, an FDA-approved where can i buy female viagra treatment, only reduces flu duration by about a single day. €œI said, 'Gee, if that’s really true [about elderberry], it would be a huge benefit,'” Macknin says. But the effectiveness and safety of elderberry is still fairly unclear. Unlike the over-the-counter medicines at your local pharmacy, elderberry hasn't been where can i buy female viagra through rigorous FDA testing and approval.

However, Macknin and his team recently published a study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, which found that elderberry treatments did nothing for flu patients. This prompts a need for further studies into the remedy — work that unfortunately stands a low chance of happening in the future, Macknin says where can i buy female viagra. Looking For ProofElderberries are full of chemicals that could be good for your health. Like similar fruits, the berries contain high levels of antioxidants, compounds that shut down reactions where can i buy female viagra in our bodies that damage cells.

But whether or not elderberry's properties also help immune systems fend off a virus is murky. There are only a handful of studies that have examined if elderberries reduced the severity or duration of the flu. And though some of the work prior to Macknin’s was well-designed and supported this herbal remedy as a helpful flu aid, at least some where can i buy female viagra — and potentially all — of those studies were funded by elderberry treatment manufacturers.Macknin says an elderberry supplement company provided his team with their products and a placebo version for free, but that the company wasn’t involved in the research beyond that. Macknin's study is the largest one conducted on elderberry to date, with 87 influenza patients completing the entire treatment course.

Participants in the where can i buy female viagra study were also welcome to take Tamiflu, for ethical reasons, as the team didn’t want to exclude anyone from taking a proven flu therapy. Additionally, each participant took home either a bottle of elderberry syrup or the placebo with instructions on when and how to take it. The research team called participants every day for a symptom check and to remind them to take their medication.By chance, it turned out that a where can i buy female viagra higher percentage of the patients given elderberry syrup had gotten their flu shot and also chose to take Tamiflu. Since the vaccination can reduce the severity of infection in recipients who still come down with the flu, the study coincidentally operated in favor of those who took the herbal remedy, Macknin says.

Those patients could have dealt with a shorter, less-intense illness because of the Tamiflu and vaccination. €œEverything was stacked to have it turn out better [for the elderberry group],” Macknin says, “and it turned out the same.” The researchers found no difference in illness duration or severity between the elderberry and placebo where can i buy female viagra groups. While analyzing the data, the team also found that those on the herbal treatment might have actually fared worse than those on the placebo. The potential for this intervention to actually harm instead of help influenza patients where can i buy female viagra explains why Macknin thinks the therapy needs further research.But, don't expect that work to happen any time soon.

Researchers are faced with a number of challenges when it comes to studying the efficacy of herbal remedies. For starters, where can i buy female viagra there's little financial incentive to investigate if they actually work. Plant products are challenging to patent, making them less lucrative prospects for pharmaceutical companies or research organizations to investigate. Additionally, investigations that try and prove a proposed therapy as an effective drug — like the one Macknin and his team accomplished — are expensive, Macknin says.

Those projects need FDA oversight and where can i buy female viagra additional paperwork, components that drive up study costs. €œIt’s extraordinarily expensive and there’s no money in it for anybody,” Macknin says.Talk To Your DoctorUltimately, research on elderberry therapies for flu patients is a mixed bag, and deserves more attention from scientists. However, if you still want to discuss elderberry treatments for the flu with your doctor, that’s a conversation you should feel comfortable having, says Erica McIntyre, an expert focused on health and environmental psychology in the School of Public Health at the University where can i buy female viagra of Technology Sydney. Navigating what research says about a particular herbal medicine is challenging for patients and health practitioners alike.

The process is made more complex by the range of similar-sounding products on the market that lack where can i buy female viagra standardized ingredients, McIntyre says. But when doctors judge or shame patients for asking about non-conventional healthcare interventions, the response can distance people and push them closer to potentially unproven treatments. Even worse, those individuals might start to keep their herbal remedies a secret. €œIt is that fear about being judged for use of where can i buy female viagra that medication,” McIntyre says, that drives up to 50 percent of people taking herbal treatments to withhold that information from healthcare practitioners.

That’s a dangerous choice, as some herbal and traditional medications can interact and cause health problems.If a physician shames someone for asking about alternative medicines, it’s likely time to find a new doctor, McIntyre says. Look for where can i buy female viagra someone who will listen to your concerns — whether it's that you feel traditional treatments haven’t worked for you, or that you didn’t like the side effects, the two common reasons people pursue herbal treatments in the first place. €œYou’re not necessarily looking for a doctor that will let you do whatever you want,” McIntyre says, “but that they actually consider you as a patient, your treatment choices and your treatment priorities, and communicate in a way that’s supportive.” And if a doctor suggests that you avoid a treatment you’re interested in, ask why. They generally have a good reason, McIntyre says.For now, know that even if your doctor doesn’t support you taking elderberry, there are other proven preventative measures that are worth your while — like the flu shot.

Anyone six months or older should get it, Macknin says, and where can i buy female viagra stick to the protocols we’re used to following to prevent COVID-19 infections, like social distancing, mask-wearing and hand-washing. Those measures also help prevent flu transmission, too — something, so far, no elderberry supplement package can claim.The yearly influenza season threatens to make the COVID-19 pandemic doubly deadly, but I believe that this isn’t inevitable.There are two commonly given vaccines – the pneumococcal vaccine and the Hib vaccine – that protect against bacterial pneumonias. These bacteria complicate both influenza where can i buy female viagra and COVID-19, often leading to death. My examination of disease trends and vaccination rates leads me to believe that broader use of the pneumococcal and Hib vaccines could guard against the worst effects of a COVID-19 illness.I am an immunologist and physiologist interested in the effects of combined infections on immunity.

I have where can i buy female viagra reached my insight by juxtaposing two seemingly unrelated puzzles. Infants and children get SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, but very rarely become hospitalized or die. And case numbers and death rates from COVID-19 began varying greatly from nation to nation and city to city even before lockdowns began. I wondered where can i buy female viagra why.One night I woke up with a possible answer.

Vaccination rates. Most children, beginning at age where can i buy female viagra two months, are vaccinated against numerous diseases. Adults less so. And, both infant and adult vaccination where can i buy female viagra rates vary widely across the world.

Could differences in the rates of vaccination against one or more diseases account for differences in COVID-19 risks?. As someone who had previously investigated other pandemics such as the Great Flu Pandemic of 1918-19 and AIDS, and who has worked with vaccines, I had a strong background for tracking down the relevant data to test my hypothesis.Pneumococcal Vaccination Rates Correlate With Lower COVID-19 Cases and DeathsI gathered national and some local data on vaccination rates against influenza, polio, measles-mumps-rubella (MMR), diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP), tuberculosis (BCG), pneumococci and Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib). I correlated them where can i buy female viagra with COVID-19 case rates and death rates for 24 nations that had experienced their COVID-19 outbreaks at about the same time. I controlled for factors such as percentage of the population who were obese, diabetic or elderly.I found that only pneumococcal vaccines afforded statistically significant protection against COVID-19.

Nations such as Spain, Italy, Belgium, Brazil, Peru and Chile that where can i buy female viagra have the highest COVID-19 rates per million have the poorest pneumococcal vaccination rates among both infants and adults. Nations with the lowest rates of COVID-19 – Japan, Korea, Denmark, Australia and New Zealand – have the highest rates of pneumococcal vaccination among both infants and adults.A recent preprint study (not yet peer-reviewed) from researchers at the Mayo Clinic has also reported very strong associations between pneumococcal vaccination and protection against COVID-19. This is especially true among minority patients who are bearing the brunt of where can i buy female viagra the coronavirus pandemic. The report also suggests that other vaccines, or combinations of vaccines, such as Hib and MMR may also provide protection.These results are important because in the U.S., childhood vaccination against pneumococci – which protects against Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria – varies by state from 74% to 92%.

Although the CDC recommends that all adults 18-64 in high risk groups for COVID-19 and all adults over the age of 65 get a pneumococcal vaccination, only 23% of high-risk adults and 64% of those over the age of 65 do so.Similarly, although the CDC recommends at all infants and some high-risk adults be vaccinated against Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib), only 80.7% of children in the U.S. And a handful of immunologically compromised where can i buy female viagra adults have been. Pneumococcal and Hib vaccination rates are significantly lower in minority populations in the U.S. And in countries that have been hit harder by COVID-19 than the U.S.Based on these data, I advocate universal pneumococcal and Hib vaccination among children, at-risk adults and all adults over 65 to prevent serious COVID-19 where can i buy female viagra disease.Left.

Combined rates of childhood and adult (over 65) pneumococcal vaccination (out of a possible 200). Right. Cases (per million) population of COVID-19 at about 90 days into the pandemic for 24 nations. Nations with high pneumococcal vaccination rates have low COVID-19 case rates.

(Credit. CC BY-SA)How Pneumococcal Vaccination Protects Against COVID-19Protection against serious COVID-19 disease by pneumococcal and Hib vaccines makes sense for several reasons. First, recent studies reveal that the majority of hospitalized COVID-19 patients, and in some studies nearly all, are infected with streptococci, which causes pneumococcal pneumonias, Hib or other pneumonia-causing bacteria. Pneumococcal and Hib vaccinations should protect coronavirus patients from these infections and thus significantly cut the risk of serious pneumonia.I also found that pneumococcal, Hib and possibly rubella vaccines may confer specific protection against the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19 by means of “molecular mimicry.”Molecular mimicry occurs when the immune system thinks one microbe looks like another.

In this case, proteins found in pneumococcal vaccines and, to a lesser degree, ones found in Hib and rubella vaccines as well look like several proteins produced by the SARS-CoV-2 virus.Two of these proteins found in pneumococcal vaccines mimic the spike and membrane proteins that permit the virus to infect cells. This suggests pneumococcal vaccination may prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection. Two other mimics are the nucleoprotein and replicase that control virus replication. These proteins are made after viral infection, in which case pneumococcal vaccination may control, but not prevent, SARS-CoV-2 replication.Either way, these vaccines may provide proxy protection against SARS-CoV-2 infection that we can implement right now, even before we have a specific virus vaccine.

Such protection may not be complete. People might still suffer a weakened version of COVID-19 but, like most infants and children, be protected against the worst effects of the infection.Fighting Influenza-related Pneumonias During the COVID-19 PandemicWhile the specific protection these other vaccines confer against COVID-19 has not yet been tested in a clinical trial, I advocate broader implementation of pneumococcal and Hib vaccination for one additional, well-validated reason.Pneumococcal and Hib pneumonias – both caused by bacteria – are the major causes of death following viral influenza. The influenza virus rarely causes death directly. Most often, the virus makes the lungs more susceptible to bacterial pneumonias, which are deadly.

Dozens of studies around the world have demonstrated that increasing rates of pneumococcal and Hib vaccination dramatically lowers influenza-related pneumonias.Similar studies demonstrate that the price of using these vaccines is balanced by savings due to lower rates of influenza-related hospitalizations, intensive care unit admissions and deaths. In the context of COVID-19, lowering rates of influenza-related hospitalizations and ICU admissions would free up resources to fight the coronavirus, independent of any effect these vaccines might have on SARS-CoV-2 itself. In my opinion, that is a winning scenario.In short, we need not wait for a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine to slow down COVID-19.I believe that we can and should act now by fighting the coronavirus with all the tools at our disposal, including influenza, Hib, pneumococcal and perhaps rubella vaccinations.Preventing pneumococcal and Hib complications of influenza and COVID-19, and perhaps proxy-vaccinating against SARS-CoV-2 itself, helps everyone. Administering these already available and well-tested pneumococcal and Hib vaccines to people will save money by freeing up hospital beds and ICUs.

It will also improve public health by reducing the spread of multiple infections and boost the economy by nurturing a healthier population.Robert Root-Bernstein is a Professor of Physiology at Michigan State University. This article was originally published on The Conversation under a Creative Commons liscense Read the original here.This story appeared in the November 2020 issue as "Bacteria and the Brain." Subscribe to Discover magazine for more stories like this.It’s not always easy to convince people that the human gut is a sublime and wondrous place worthy of special attention. Sarkis Mazmanian discovered that soon after arriving at Caltech for his first faculty job 14 years ago, when he explained to a local artist what he had in mind for the walls outside his new office.The resulting mural greets visitors to the Mazmanian Lab today. A vaguely psychedelic, 40-foot-long, tube-shaped colon that’s pink, purple and red snakes down the hallway.

In a panel next to it, fluorescent yellow and green bacteria explode out of a deeply inflamed section of the intestinal tract, like radioactive lava from outer space.The mural is modest compared with what the scientist has been working on since. Over the last decade or so, Mazmanian has been a leading proponent of the idea that the flora of the human digestive tract has a far more powerful effect on the human body and mind than we thought — a scientific effort that earned him a $500,000 MacArthur Fellowship “Genius Grant” in 2012. Since then, Mazmanian and a small but growing cadre of fellow microbiologists have amassed a tantalizing body of evidence on the microbiome’s role in all kinds of brain disorders, including schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and depression.But the results they’ve seen in autism could, in the end, prove the most transformative. Autism affects about 1 in 59 children in the U.S., and involves profound social withdrawal, communication problems, and sometimes anxiety and aggression.

The causes of the brain disorder have remained speculative. Now, Mazmanian and other researchers are finding that autism may be inextricably linked to — or even caused by — irregularities in the gut microbiome.A Biology StoryAt 47, Mazmanian — with his shaved head, flannel shirt and skinny jeans — resembles a young, urban hipster on his way to write at the local café. Originally, literary life was his plan. Born in Lebanon to two Armenian refugees, neither of whom had more than a first-grade education, Mazmanian landed in the class of an energetic high school English teacher in California’s San Fernando Valley, where his family first settled.

The teacher recognized his gift for language and encouraged him to pursue a career in literature. Mazmanian enrolled at UCLA in 1990, planning to major in English.Everything changed when he took his first biology class. Hunched over his new, thick textbook in the library, reading about basic biological concepts like photosynthesis, Mazmanian felt a vast new world opening up to him.Sarkis Mazmanian, shown in front of a mural that celebrates the human gut, is part of a group of microbiologists researching the effects of the digestive tract on a range of disorders. (Credit.

Caltech)“For the first time in my life, I wanted to turn the page and see where the story was going to go,” he says. €œI think I decided that minute to become a scientist.”Mazmanian was most fascinated by the idea that tiny organisms, invisible to the naked eye, could function as powerful, self-contained machines — powerful enough to take over and destroy the human body. After graduating with a degree in microbiology, Mazmanian joined a UCLA infectious diseases lab and began studying bacteria that cause staph infections.As his dissertation defense approached, Mazmanian read a one-page commentary penned by a prominent microbiologist, highlighting the fact that our intestines are teeming with hundreds, if not thousands, of different species of bacteria. But it was still largely unknown what they are and how they affect the human body.When Mazmanian dug further, he found that no one had yet answered what seemed to him to be the most obvious question.

Why would the human immune system, designed to attack and destroy foreign invaders, allow hundreds of species of bacteria to live and thrive in our guts unmolested?. To him, the bacteria’s survival implied that we had evolved to coexist with them. And if that were so, he reasoned, there must be some benefit to both the microbes and the human body — a symbiotic relationship. But what was it?.

Gut InvadersMazmanian set out to study the link between gut microbes and the immune system. As a postdoctoral researcher, he joined the lab of Harvard University infectious disease specialist Dennis Kasper.To start, Mazmanian examined how the immune systems of germ-free mice — lab mice completely protected, starting at birth, from all microbes — differed from those of mice with either few or normal levels of microbes. He expected this initial census would be just a first step in a long and arduous quest for scientific pay dirt. But when he went to examine a printout of his results in the lab, he realized immediately he might already be onto something big.

The germ-free mice had a 30 to 40 percent reduction in a specific type of immune cell known as helper T-cells.This colorized close-up of a mouse’s gut reveals the tight relationship between the gut microbe Bacteroides fragilis (red) and the epithelial surface of the colon (blue). (Credit. Caltech)Since helper T-cells play a key role in coordinating attacks against invading pathogens, the finding suggested that the immune systems of the germ-free mice were far less robust than those found in peers with normal levels of microbes.“That was exciting, right?. € Mazmanian recalls.

€œObviously I repeated it and tested it in a number of different ways. Then I asked the next question. €˜Can I restore the [immune] function in an adult animal?. €™â€‰â€Mazmanian colonized the guts of the immunocompromised, germ-free mice with microbes from standard lab mice.

After receiving the fecal transplant, their T-cell counts shot up. Within a month, their numbers were identical to mice raised outside the germ-free bubble.Resolving to identify the microorganisms causing this transformation, Mazmanian resorted to trial and error. One by one, he added strains of bacteria found in the guts of mice to the guts of germ-free mice.He got nowhere with the first five or six species he examined. Then, simply because it was convenient, he decided to test one more that was readily available in his lab.

Mazmanian’s adviser, Kasper, had been studying a gut microbe called Bacteroides fragilis. When Mazmanian implanted one of Kasper’s specimens into the gut of his germ-free mice, the results were dramatic. The T-cell numbers spiked to normal. Eventually, Mazmanian demonstrated he could reproduce this effect simply by adding a single molecule that these bacteria produce, called polysaccharide A, to their guts.“There was no logic in the choice whatsoever,” Mazmanian recalls.

€œ[B. Fragilis] was available, it came from the gut.” In other words, he got lucky.Mazmanian dug deeper and discovered that the biggest impact B. Fragilis had was on the population of a subtype of helper T-cells called regulatory, or suppressor, T-cells. These cells play a key role in preventing the immune system from attacking its host body, protecting against autoimmune or inflammatory diseases.

It was the first time any scientist had demonstrated that a single compound from a single microbe could reverse a specific problem with the immune system.To Mazmanian, the finding, published in 2005 in the journal Cell, alluded to new approaches to treating a wide array of autoimmune, inflammatory and allergic disorders. What if it were possible to help a faulty immune system by tweaking a patient’s microbiome?. It was with this exploration in mind that he arrived in Pasadena in 2006 to set up his lab at Caltech.A Convenient CollaborationA few years later, Mazmanian was having lunch on campus with neuroscientist and colleague Paul Patterson. Patterson had been preoccupied with a mystery that had, for years, confounded those studying autism in humans.

When pregnant mothers have a severe infection in the second trimester, their babies are much more likely to develop autism.As Mazmanian tells it, Patterson was a man of few words, and at lunch Mazmanian was “going on and on” about his own work.“You know,” Patterson interjected thoughtfully, “I think kids with autism have GI issues.”Patterson recalled reading that something like 60 percent of children with autism had some form of clinical GI problem, such as bloating, constipation, flatulence or diarrhea. Was it possible, he wondered, that there was a microbiome connection?. As they talked, Mazmanian’s excitement grew.A few years earlier, Patterson had discovered that when he exposed pregnant mice to pathogens like the influenza virus, they gave birth to pups that grew up more likely to be startled by loud noises, to shy away from social contact and to groom themselves repetitively — symptoms that resemble those of autism. Patterson was in the process of comparing the brains of these autism-mimicking mice with their neurotypical cousins to see if he could detect any differences that might explain how the maternal immune system was somehow interfering with the pups’ brain development.Mazmanian had a suggestion.

The next time Patterson sacrificed one of his autistic mice to study their brains, what if he set the intestines aside for his colleague down the hall?. When the guts arrived in Mazmanian’s lab, he found that the intestines of the neurotypical mice looked normal. But the guts of the autism-mimicking offspring were almost uniformly inflamed. Could it be that the microbiome was the cause of this inflammation?.

And could that, in turn, be somehow connected to the behavioral symptoms?. Throughout the winter and spring of 2012, Mazmanian and Patterson continued their conversation. Mazmanian found distinct differences in the microbiomes of the mice. And, they noticed, the mice with the features of autism had leaky gut syndrome, an increased permeability of the gut lining that can allow pathogens and allergens to leach out.

This condition had also been reported in children with autism.So Mazmanian and Patterson turned their attention outside the gut. They took blood samples to see if any gut microbes, or the compounds they produce, were circulating in the rest of the body. They homed in on one molecule in particular, called 4-ethylphenyl sulfate, which was roughly 45 times as abundant in the mice that had symptoms of autism. And it looked familiar.

Structurally, it was almost identical to a molecule recently found to be significantly elevated in human children with autism.It was enough to take the next step. Every day for three weeks, Mazmanian injected the molecule, harvested from the mice with autism-like symptoms, directly into the bloodstream of 5-week-old normal lab mice (the age at which the autistic mice normally developed leaky gut). Then Mazmanian and his team gave them a series of behavioral tests. The mice were far more easily startled and were less comfortable in large empty spaces than their untreated peers, indications of an increase in anxiety-related behaviors commonly seen in the mice with autism-like symptoms.

The researchers published their results in Cell in 2013.Though surprising, the data made sense in some ways. Many drug companies rely on small-molecule drugs that can be taken orally, but still manage to cross the blood-brain barrier and affect behavior. It seemed entirely possible that small molecules, created by bacteria in the gut, could enter the bloodstream and reach the brain. And they don’t even have to leak out of the gut to do so.Of Mice and MenPatterson died in 2014, at age 70, just six months after the publication of the duo’s groundbreaking Cell paper.

Around the same time, a series of parallel experiments in a clinic hundreds of miles away was already paving the way forward. While Patterson and Mazmanian had been working in mice, Rosa Krajmalnik-Brown, a microbiologist at Arizona State University, had teamed up with Jim Adams, who directs the university’s autism and Asperger’s research program, to study humans.The researchers were conducting a detailed analysis of the microbiome of human autism patients and found that the bacteria were far less diverse in the children with autism. Notably, several important species involved in the digestion of carbohydrates were severely depleted.Krajmalnik-Brown and Adams launched a preliminary trial to test the effects of fecal transplants on 18 children between the ages of 7 and 16 with severe autism, who also had severe GI issues. The researchers administered powerful antibiotics to kill off the microbiomes of the children and followed them with a bowel cleanse.

They then replaced the microbes with transplanted flora taken from the guts of healthy neurotypical adult volunteers.The results were better than anyone could have expected. The procedure resulted in a large reduction in GI symptoms and increased the diversity of bacteria in the children’s guts. But more significantly, their neurological symptoms were reduced. At the onset of the study in 2017, an independent evaluator found 83 percent of participants had severe autism.

Two years after the initial trial, only 17 percent were rated as severely autistic. And 44 percent were no longer on the autism scale.“[My child] did a complete 180,” says Dana Woods, whose then-7-year-old son Ethan enrolled in the initial study five years ago. €œHis ability to communicate is so much different now. He’s just so much more present.

He’s so much more aware. He’s no longer in occupational therapy. He’s no longer in speech therapy. After the study, he tested two points away from a neurotypical child.”In their first report on the trial in 2017, the team highlighted a number of distinct changes in the microbiome after the transplants, in particular a surge in the populations of three types of bacteria.

Among them was a four-fold increase in Bifidobacterium, a probiotic organism that seems to play a key role in the maintenance of a healthy gut.But figuring out what was happening on a cellular level — to really look inside some guts — would require another vehicle. The ASU team needed Mazmanian’s mice.“At the end of the day, what we care about is healing people and how the microbiome affects people,” explains Krajmalnik-Brown. €œThat’s why we work with people. But with mice you can do things that are more mechanistic.”The Great Mouse Detective(Credit.

Caltech)Together, Krajmalnik-Brown, Mazmanian and their collaborators would uncover some tantalizing new insights that go a long way to solving the mystery. In May 2019, the team published another high-profile paper in Cell, after they transplanted stool samples from Krajmalnik-Brown’s severely autistic patients into the guts of Mazmanian’s germ-free mice. The offspring of these mice showed the autism-like symptoms, such as repetitive and compulsive behavior.This time, the team dug even deeper into the biochemical processes playing out in the brain, looking not just at behavior but at the chemicals involved in creating it. The mice that developed autism-like behaviors had measurably lower levels of two substances called taurine and 5-aminovaleric acid (5AV).

When they dug into the literature, the team learned that these two substances are known to mimic activity of a key signaling agent in the brain called gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) — a neurotransmitter that other studies have found is deficient in the brains of children with autism.What’s more, some have speculated that the tendency of children with autism to experience sensory overstimulation may stem from the inability to tamp down overexcited neurons. A lack of GABA could lead to just that.The scientists next orally administered high levels of taurine and 5AV to pregnant mice with the autistic children’s microbiomes. When their pups were born, the researchers continued to feed the young the substances until they reached adulthood. Compared with untreated animals, the second-generation mice had significantly fewer behavioral symptoms.

Taurine reduced repetitive behavior, as measured by marble burying, increased the level of social interaction, and relieved anxiety. Mice administered 5AV were more active and social.“We healed humans with behavioral problems,” says Krajmalnik-Brown. €œ[And we] transferred some of those deficits and behaviors to mice — basically the opposite. It’s huge.”Mazmanian hopes to take the next step in the months ahead.“I can flip a switch, turn on a light, I know that switch turns on that light.

I don’t know the circuit, I don’t know where the wire is,” Mazmanian says. €œExactly how that’s happening … we just don’t understand that.”This most recent study, by itself, hardly proves that dysregulated microbiomes cause the brain disorder — a point that plenty of other scientists skeptical of Mazmanian’s work are happy to make.“The paper made a big splash, but trying to model psychiatric-related human conditions in mice, in my view, is a little bit of a stretch,” says Sangram Sisodia, a neurobiologist at the University of Chicago who studies the microbiome. €œA mouse with autism?. €Nor was that the only criticism.

Several researchers have suggested that the group didn’t give proper attention to one of their tests ­— one whose results conflicted with their thesis ­— while others found flaws in the statistical methods they used to assess their results. Mazmanian downplays these criticisms, but agrees the work is not yet conclusive.Meanwhile, the ASU trial has also engendered skepticism, mainly due to its tiny sample size, the lack of a control group and the methods by which the children were assessed for autism severity. Krajmalnik-Brown and Adams say they stand by their results, but agree more research is needed. In recent months, they have launched two new studies that will address these issues.Adams insists the work is already changing lives.

€œWe followed up with every one of our 18 participants,” he says, referring to the children who received fecal transplants. €œSure enough, we found that most of the GI benefits had remained. And family after family said their child just slowly, steadily continued making more improvement.” They published the update in Scientific Reports in spring 2019.“I’m not ready to say the case is closed,” says Mazmanian. €œHealthy skepticism is a good thing.

I believe the preclinical data, I believe the mouse data. But there’s a lot of studies that still need to be done.” A Healthy Gut, A New OutlookEthan Woods had GI issues and symptoms of autism until researchers introduced new microbes to his gut. His mother says the treatment changed everything. (Credit.

Dana Woods)Prior to his fecal transplant at age 7, Ethan Woods suffered from chronic and severe diarrhea, constipation and cramping, symptoms so extreme that to his mother, Dana, he sounded like “a bit like a woman in labor when he was trying to have a bowel movement.” “It was just awful watching your child go through this,” she says, explaining that when she enrolled her autistic son in the Arizona State study, her “only goal was to fix his gut.”Remarkably, Ethan’s agony began to disappear just a few weeks into the trial. But that was not the most dramatic difference. Before the transplant, Ethan’s speech was drawn out and slow, his language skills rudimentary. He seemed to live in his own bubble.

He had frequent outbursts. For as long as Dana could remember, her mornings with Ethan had been marked by arguing, fighting, pushing and anger. But then one morning, something shocking happened.“He woke me up one morning with his face right in my face with this big smile and he said, ‘Morning, Mom!. €™â€‰â€ she recalls.

€œAnd he was just excited and happy and ready to go about his day with this big smile. It choked me up to the point where I teared up because I had never experienced a happy kid in the morning.”Later, Ethan carried over an iPad and opened an app with a talking cat that repeats back the words children speak aloud. He played back a video recording of himself from just a few weeks earlier.“[He] looks me in the eye and says, ‘Mom, why did I talk like that?. What is wrong with me?.

€™ And as soon as he did that, I caught my breath. I had to compose myself and say, ‘I don’t know. But do you feel better?. Do you feel different?.

Why do you think?. €™â€‰â€Ethan’s communication skills had already begun to improve. Within a year of the study, his speech therapist graduated him from speech therapy because he had met all his goals.“He went from one end of the rainbow all the way to the other end of the rainbow,” she says. €œPrior to the study, I was very afraid.

My biggest fear was ‘how is he going to navigate the world when I’m not here?. €™ And I think I have a lot of hope now that he is going to be OK now on his own.”There’s something strange about the female orgasm, something that scientists have been unable to explain. Biological functions are normally discussed in terms of evolutionary pressure, or reproductive advantage. If a biological trait improves your chances of having more offspring, then it’s more likely to stick around in your species.

The male orgasm makes perfect sense — ejaculate contains the genetic material that’s necessary for making babies. But the female orgasm has been harder to nail down. Fertilization doesn’t depend on it, and “fun” isn’t exactly in the pantheon of evolutionary explanations.Researchers that study how the female orgasm relates to reproductive success have two main options — either ask people invasive questions about their most personal moments, or to find a way to stick probes in or on them during said moments. Neither of these approaches have resulted in the kind of “wet lab” research that’s the gold standard for biological understanding.What we do know, despite widespread cultural discomfort with talking openly about sex and pleasure, is that there appears to be significant sexual dysfunction in American society.

Back in 2014, researchers from the Kinsey Institute, the preeminent U.S. Academy for the study of sex and relationships, said as much. In a survey of nearly 3,000 people, they found that men, straight or gay, orgasmed 85 percent of the time during consensual sexual encounters. Lesbian women orgasmed less often, 75 percent of the time, while straight women fared worst with just a 60 percent chance of orgasm.

Other studies have shown that something like 10-15 percent of women experience lifelong anorgasmia, meaning they’ve never experienced orgasm. A further 40 percent of women report some kind of inability to reach orgasm in the past year.The orgasm gap is hard to explain. Some think that it comes down to straight men’s finesse, or lack thereof, citing the difference between straight and lesbian satisfaction. Indeed, it makes sense that knowing your way around the territory would help.

But for many couples this isn’t a helpful revelation, since the emotional maturity necessary to teach sexual dexterity is often out of reach. Shortcut to SatisfactionLuckily, we live in an era of Silicon Valley disruption, which has even started lapping at the shores of sex research. Technologist Liz Klinger is at the forefront of this transition. She and her team have built a platform that lets people become citizen scientists of sex —without ever having to get out from between the sheets.About a decade ago, Klinger’s company, Lioness, released what they billed as the first “smart vibrator,” a sex toy that could actually learn about you.

The final product was a far cry from the first prototype, which was much more laboratory object than sex toy.The “test device was this whole mess of wires, with a hard connection. We had to physically send it to our beta testers, who used it and sent it back,” recalls Klinger. The researchers would download the data collected by the toy’s four sensors — temperature, motion, acceleration and pressure — and compile it into a chart that represented arousal and orgasm, as told through the story of pelvic-floor muscle contractions.It was an immediate success for sex partners who needed ways to talk about pleasure in a more objective way. Klinger recalled that when she got the first beta-test couple on the phone, “the wife was like ‘holy crap, we finally were able to talk about these things that I’ve had a lot of trouble talking about.’ It turned out that she wanted more foreplay, and he didn’t know quite that that meant.

He’d spend more time, but it just didn’t match up, you know?. € With the company’s signature offering in hand — a chart of sexual arousal over time — Klinger found that couples could have a conversation “without the subtext of ‘oh, you’re not good enough, or I don’t like you enough,’ on the husband’s part and ‘I’m so tired of talking about this’ on the wife’s part,” she says. The chart “can change people’s perceptions of their own experiences, and how they talk about them with others.”Doing the Deed — For ScienceThis spring, the company has launched a research platform dubbed Lioness 2.0 — a new optional service that, unsurprisingly, their data-obsessed users have greeted with open arms. Now, instead of simply using the toy to understand themselves better, Lioness owners can opt in to the kinds of hands-on studies that are necessary for a deeper understanding of sex and pleasure.

So far, the company is working with Nigeria’s Society for Family Health to study how pleasure changes with menopause across age, race and orientation, as well as with the U.S.’s Center for Genital Health and Education to explore the role of pelvic floor muscles in orgasm.Pani Farvid, a professor of applied psychology at The New School in New York City, has some reservations about the platform. €œI really like what they’re trying to do, but there could be more added to make it a bit more comprehensive. My concern is that there's a misconception that sex is just about the orgasm, that it’s just physiological and that pleasure just has to do with the genitals.” From where she’s sitting, “that’s a very mechanical view of sexuality.” If the Lioness is helping to equalize the orgasm gap, or helping people understand their bodies better, “I think that's great,” says Farvid. €œBut as a critical sexologist, I'm interested in delving deeper into what these practices mean.” If sex is hyper-focused on orgasm, to exclusion of everything else, she cautions that these norms “have real-life negative impacts on people's sex lives and their sense of themselves.”At this point, knee-deep in an era of data collection that was once the sole purview of white-coat-wearing scientists, it’s old news that we need to be careful with what our technology is doing to us.

No tool can serve as a cure-all, even if it comes loaded with a neat app and some space-age sensors. What it can offer, though, is the opportunity to start a conversation, and the chance to take a long, honest look at something about yourself — whether it’s the number of steps you take every day, or the way you want to be touched.Wondering how to keep your glasses from fogging up when your mask is on?. Look no further. If we've learned one thing throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, it's the importance of wearing a mask.

Countless studies have shown over the past eight months that wearing a protective barrier over your nose and mouth — whether it's a standard-issue surgical mask or an N95 respirator — can significantly decrease the odds of catching and transmitting disease. What's more, some research shows that masking up can reduce the severity of an infection if a masked person does contract COVID-19. But while masks are potentially lifesaving, they can be uncomfortable, often changing your breathing patterns and fogging up your glasses when breath escapes through the top of the mask. Among people who choose not to wear a mask to prevent the spread of COVID-19, many cite discomfort as a key reason why.Wesley Wilson, a tumor immunologist in Pennsylvania, knows how annoying it can be when your glasses are fogging up.

He says fogging is “definitely a problem” among his hospital colleagues, who need to wear protective goggles and surgical masks while on the job. Fortunately, they've also picked up a few helpful hacks for keeping their vision clear while wearing a mask with glasses.#1. Use Tape“If you have to keep your mask on for hours, tape works like a charm,” Wilson says. This especially applies to healthcare professionals in his practice who are required to keep their masks on at all times, except during lunch.

€œIf you're putting on your mask and taking it off a lot, tape probably isn't practical — but two small pieces of tape on the cheeks keep the mask fitted closer to your face, and the hot air out of your glasses,” he says.#2. Fit the Mask to Your FaceWhile some air leakage is to be expected, wearing a mask that fits securely to your face will prevent glass fogging and filter the virus more effectively since less air is coming in or out. Find surgical masks or N95s that come with a nose bridge, a small, flexible piece of metal or plastic that allows the mask to more closely fit the contours of your face. Nose bridges can be sewn inside masks or affixed to the front.Read More.

Why It Feels Like You Can't Breathe Inside Your Face Mask#3. Adjust Your MaskAccording to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, a minor adjustment in how you wear your mask could be enough to prevent fog as well. Simply pull the mask over your nose and rest your glasses on top of your face mask. As long as the mask is fitted close to your face, this should prevent hot air from slipping out.#4.

Spray Your GlassesA former ice hockey player, Wilson says the protective visor under his helmet would often fog with hot air while he was on the ice during games. Like an ocean diver, he would use de-misting solution or a defogging spray (such as this one) to keep his visor free of fog. The same concept applies to eyeglass fog caused by masking, he says. €œYou can either buy a spray or you can make your own with either shaving cream or soap and water,” says Wilson.

€œWiping some shaving cream on your glasses and then wiping it off will coat them with a similar surface-tension altering compound that prevents fog.”.

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6 October 2020 The Royal College of Pathologists has gas station viagra awarded David Wells an Honorary Fellowship for his collaborative and patient centred approach David Wells, IBMS Chair of Membership and Marketing Committee and also London Region Council Member, has been awarded an Honorary Fellowship from The Royal College of Pathologists (RCPath).RCPath recognised that David's roles in the IBMS makes him part of a practice leadership group that has supported the profession through a time of huge changes and through great pressure and transformation during the recent pandemic. As Head of Pathology Services Consolidation at NHS England and NHS Improvement, RCPath recognised that David has helped to drive change in UK pathology that has attracted global attention, especially due to his excellent work with networking and consolidation. He strives to embed pathology into the heart of healthcare by supporting the adoption of digital systems, gas station viagra while also influencing key national health policies and government-funded initiatives. His approach to the modernisation of the field is ensuring the sustainability of pathology expertise for the future – but he still manages to find time to inspire future laboratory medicine professionals.

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6 October 2020 The Royal College of Pathologists has awarded David Wells an Honorary Fellowship for his where can i buy female viagra collaborative and patient centred approach David Wells, IBMS Chair of Membership and Marketing Committee and also London Region Council Member, has been awarded an Honorary Fellowship from The Royal College of Pathologists (RCPath).RCPath recognised that David's roles in the IBMS makes him part of a practice leadership group that has supported the profession through a time of huge changes and through great pressure and transformation during the recent pandemic. As Head of Pathology Services Consolidation at NHS England and NHS Improvement, RCPath recognised that David has helped to drive change in UK pathology that has attracted global attention, especially due to his excellent work with networking and consolidation. He strives to embed pathology into the heart of healthcare by supporting the adoption of digital systems, while also influencing key national health policies and government-funded initiatives where can i buy female viagra. His approach to the modernisation of the field is ensuring the sustainability of pathology expertise for the future – but he still manages to find time to inspire future laboratory medicine professionals. RCPath also acknowledged that David has worked with the College to ensure that the Carter reorganisation and consolidation plans are sensibly implemented, achieving the aims of savings, but keeping an eye on where can i buy female viagra the preservation of specialist services and training and development.

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Date published viagra for men for sale. October 7, 2020On this page OverviewAs the global COVID-19 pandemic emerged in December 2019, the need for coherent, pan-Canadian guidance on provincial and territorial testing was quickly recognized. Led by the National viagra for men for sale Microbiology Laboratory, initial interim guidance on laboratory testing was developed in consultation with the Canadian Public Health Lab Network and was finalized and approved by the Special Advisory Committee on April 16, 2020. This guidance was based on scientific evidence and testing resources available at that time. The recommended testing guidance focused on the molecular polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as the sole laboratory technique to accurately identify SARS-CoV-2 in a patient sample.In May 2020, based on new evidence, the National Laboratory Testing Indication Guidance for COVID-19 was updated to reflect developments in four areas.

Expanded laboratory resources viral transmission from asymptomatic individuals or individuals in the pre-symptomatic phase outbreaks in congregate living and work settings new testing modalities (molecular Point of Care and serological tests)The COVID-19 landscape has further evolved and it is now necessary to update key aspects of this document to reflect recent scientific and public health data viagra for men for sale. One key consideration relates to limiting asymptomatic diagnostic PCR testing where public health action could have significant benefits. Several pilot programs were conducted in Canada, confirming very low levels of COVID-19 in the general population viagra for men for sale and supporting an evidence-based approach to the relaunch of economic activity. In addition, it enabled jurisdictions to stress-test testing capacity and prepare jurisdictions for higher testing volumes. Asymptomatic testing was also found to displace diagnostic capacity for symptomatic individuals, close contacts, high-risk settings and outbreak management.

The National Laboratory Testing Indication Guidancefor COVID-19 has been updated to reflect these learnings and advances in science.Recognizing viagra for men for sale that testing regimes are within provincial and territorial jurisdiction, this document reflects the collaboration among jurisdictions, leveraging learnings from one another through the different adopted approaches.Emerging testing and screening technologiesThe Pan-Canadian COVID-19 Testing and Screening Guidance is designed to reflect changing risk management approaches as the pandemic conditions change. Recognizing that one size does not fit all, the Guidance is also designed to respond to a significant increase in the need to access testing and screening technologies. Scaling to meet increased and sustained testing and screening demand will require a paradigm shift, broadening the technologies that are used in a manner that is tailored to the purpose and application of technologies in a variety of settings. Although PCR remains the gold standard in diagnostic testing, numerous technologies and testing modalities are emerging that could serve viagra for men for sale to supplement diagnostic testing. These recent testing and sampling options could create opportunities to expand the approach to testing by including broad-based approaches to screening through less sensitive and potentially more cost-effective technologies, thereby alleviating strain on the overall public health system.While they can be less sensitive, these technologies could have multiple benefits including ease and reduced cost of production, improved efficiency and reduced reliance on PCR testing supplies.

They also have the potential to be less viagra for men for sale invasive depending on the technology. Antigen and extraction-free nucleic acid testing are examples of such technologies that, in addition to being more cost-effective and easier to produce, are also easily adaptable to mobile, rapid applications. However, due to their lower sensitivity than current PCR technology, these emerging technologies may be better used as a part of screening, in conjunction with repeated testing in some settings. Recognizing that these novel technologies have lower sensitivity and specificity than current PCR technology, their use should be targeted to scenarios where both positive and viagra for men for sale negative are interpreted and acted upon appropriately.Complementing the deployment of these emerging technologies, techniques such as pooled testing are being used to contribute to the preservation of testing resources. Governments are also tapping non-traditional data sources to complement case data.

For example, data for wastewater testing could complement COVID-19 surveillance systems by providing readily accessible pooled community samples and data for communities where testing is not available or underutilized.As of September 29, Health Canada has authorized 36 COVID-19 testing devices (PCR and serological). Health Canada is fast-tracking the review of submissions related to antigen and nucleic viagra for men for sale acid tests. Submissions that are reviewed include various sample types, including saliva. Consult the list of authorized medical devices for uses related to COVID-19.In anticipation of regulatory approval for antigen tests, an Interim Guidance on Antigen Testing has been developed to outline potential scenarios such as routine outbreak monitoring, monitoring in different situations including high-risk settings (for example, long-term care facilities) and possible adaptation into mobile, rapid testing in rural and remote communities.Pan-Canadian COVID-19 Testing and Screening GuidanceLike the Laboratory Testing Guidance, viagra for men for sale the Pan-Canadian COVID-19 Testing and Screening Guidance (“Guidance”) is based on new public health evidence and emerging technologies, while adopting a broadened approach that leverages and tailors technologies to appropriate uses. The Guidance is designed to protect and expand the resilience of federal, provincial and territorial testing and screening capacity.The Guidance is based on a portfolio approach that uses different types of testing technologies for various purposes (diagnostic, screening, surveillance).

The intent of the Guidance is to better use testing resources to target the most relevant test in particular situations or use cases to address specific problems or purposes. Figure 1 viagra for men for sale. Technology streams of Pan-Canadian COVID-19 Testing and Screening Guidance Figure 1. Technology streams of Pan-Canadian COVID-19 Testing and Screening Guidance - Text equivalent Testing. Definitive diagnosis of viagra for men for sale COVID-19 with high sensitivity PCR-based tests, with potential refinements to specimen collecting modalities (for example, saliva) Less amenable to high frequency conduct due to greater resource utilization Screening.

Indicative of COVID-19 status, with lower sensitivity Typically newer, rapid technology approaches Amenable to higher frequency repetition and more easily scalable Surveillance. Use of traditional and non-traditional data viagra for men for sale sources to complement case data Wastewater surveillance complements conventional COVID-19 surveillance systems by providing. efficient pooled community sample data for communities where timely clinical testing is underutilized or unavailable data at the local level Five key foundational, interrelated pillars support the advancement of the Guidance. Scientific integrity regulatory excellence proactive procurement robust data and capacity strategic communication and partnershipsUpdates to laboratory testing and antigen testing guidance founded on rigorous scientific integrity enable and inform decision-making on testing allocations within Canada, and support jurisdictions in the timely use of emerging technologies once regulatory approval is received. Regulatory excellence is equally important as a foundational pillar to implementing the Guidance in a manner that allows for rapid approvals while still preserving viagra for men for sale the scientific integrity of the process.In addition, undertaking a proactive procurement approach ensures steady access to equipment and supplies for testing and screening.

Governments continue to take a proactive procurement approach, purchasing whenever possible, contingent on regulatory approvals.Timely and comprehensive data is critical, underpinning decision-making by governments. Governments have established a new data set for COVID-19 cases that provides more targeted information, improving the ability to understand whether infections are acquired via domestic or international travel, or if they are linked to a known outbreak. Race and viagra for men for sale ethnicity indicators have been added as well as greater information on health care workers, allowing a better understanding of the COVID-19 experience among different population groups. In addition to the case data, key data on turnaround times for testing and contact tracing, for example, can also help identify issues related to capacity and timeliness of interventions.Finally, in addition to strong federal, provincial and territorial partnerships, relationships are being further enhanced with key partners in industry and the scientific community. While ensuring rapid and effective progress is critical, it is also important viagra for men for sale to communicate what we know, what we are doing and what we are going to do.

This collaboration and transparency supports critical decisions, including what additional capacity may be required as part of the Guidance, for instance, federal surge capacity to supplement provincial and territorial leadership. Strategic communications and partnerships are critical to maintaining and strengthening the confidence of Canadians in Governments' actions to address COVID-19. Implementation plan viagra for men for sale of the Pan-Canadian COVID-19 Testing and Screening Guidance. Updated Guidance Scientific integrity Regulatory excellence Proactive procurement Robust data and capacity Strategic communications and partnerships Regularly updated public health advice as science evolves Updated national lab testing indication guidance Interim antigen testing guidance Guidance on sample types Prioritized, timely review of emerging and promising technologies Responsive to testing, screening and surveillance developments Founded in and driven by scientific excellence Linking regulatory pipeline with production capacity Prioritizing made in Canada solutions Advance purchasing of promising technologies Surge capacity through full value chain and timely, comprehensive data Improving national performance data (turnaround times) Surge capacity for sample collection, lab testing contact tracing Working closely with key partners FPT. Enables agile responses to emerging issues Industry.

Linking public health and workforce requirements Tapping emerging tech Public education/understanding Looking forwardThe Guidance is viagra for men for sale expected to evolve as the state of knowledge and risk management strategies continue to develop. Guidance on sample types is expected to be finalized during the fall and the balance of testing and screening technologies will be adjusted to respond to the needs of various populations. Researchers and companies continue to innovate and develop viagra for men for sale new technologies and solutions. Guidance will need to keep pace with, and take advantage of, these innovations. The continuous updating of this Guidance will rely on strong federal, provincial and territorial partnerships and collaboration leveraging key governance bodies, including the Special Advisory Committee.

The Guidance will also capitalize on opportunities to leverage input and the capacity to mobilize knowledge in Canada and from around the world.Related linksOn this page Purpose and backgroundThe purpose of this notice is to communicate minimum values of sensitivity for COVID-19 antigen testing devices.Health Canada refers to guidance viagra for men for sale published by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on antigen detecting tests. This guidance outlines the requirements that these products must meet. This document addresses viagra for men for sale only sensitivity for antigen tests. It complements the published FDA guidance.Sensitivity is technically a measure of the accuracy of a test against a reference standard.

No such standard exists at this time, therefore the accuracy of the viagra for men for sale positive results from a test is currently expressed as the positive percent agreement (PPA). The term sensitivity is used throughout this document in place of PPA for ease of reading. Sensitivity is the proportion of subjects with the target condition in whom the test is positiveIt is an important measure to determine whether test information is useful and reliable.Minimum value for sensitivity Health Canada does not usually set minimum standards for sensitivity. Normally we review the submitted data to determine whether a test performs to the standard claimed by the manufacturer viagra for men for sale. We then compare that to the standard claimed by similar tests.

However, the COVID-19 pandemic is a unique public health crisis. For this reason, we are taking a different approach.We have set minimum standards for sensitivity that a COVID-19 antigen test must meet in order for us to consider it for viagra for men for sale authorization. Tests with sensitivity below this minimum do not meet the criteria of 5(c) and (d) of the interim order on the importation and sale of medical devices for use in relation to COVID-19. For this reason, they will not be authorized.Health Canada viagra for men for sale considers the following to be unacceptable for authorization. Sensitivity below 80% Sensitivity values below this level will produce too many false negative results.

These tests will not be authorized, regardless of other factors.Future considerationsHealth Canada’s target value aligns with the FDA target. However, as more viagra for men for sale research results become available, we may revise this value accordingly.Health Canada welcomes applications for technologies that meet or exceed the minimum limit value. We will continue to monitor emerging science and international experience to determine whether we need to amend this value.Contact usPlease email your questions or comments about this notice to. Hc.meddevices-instrumentsmed.sc@canada.ca.Related Links.

Date published where can i buy female viagra. October 7, 2020On this page OverviewAs the global COVID-19 pandemic emerged in December 2019, the need for coherent, pan-Canadian guidance on provincial and territorial testing was quickly recognized. Led by the National Microbiology Laboratory, initial interim guidance on laboratory testing was developed in consultation with the Canadian Public Health Lab Network and was finalized and approved by the where can i buy female viagra Special Advisory Committee on April 16, 2020. This guidance was based on scientific evidence and testing resources available at that time.

The recommended testing guidance focused on the molecular polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as the sole laboratory technique to accurately identify SARS-CoV-2 in a patient sample.In May 2020, based on new evidence, the National Laboratory Testing Indication Guidance for COVID-19 was updated to reflect developments in four areas. Expanded laboratory resources viral transmission from asymptomatic individuals or individuals in the pre-symptomatic phase outbreaks in congregate living where can i buy female viagra and work settings new testing modalities (molecular Point of Care and serological tests)The COVID-19 landscape has further evolved and it is now necessary to update key aspects of this document to reflect recent scientific and public health data. One key consideration relates to limiting asymptomatic diagnostic PCR testing where public health action could have significant benefits. Several pilot programs were conducted where can i buy female viagra in Canada, confirming very low levels of COVID-19 in the general population and supporting an evidence-based approach to the relaunch of economic activity.

In addition, it enabled jurisdictions to stress-test testing capacity and prepare jurisdictions for higher testing volumes. Asymptomatic testing was also found to displace diagnostic capacity for symptomatic individuals, close contacts, high-risk settings and outbreak management. The National Laboratory Testing Indication Guidancefor COVID-19 has been updated to reflect these learnings and advances in science.Recognizing that testing regimes are within provincial and territorial jurisdiction, this document reflects the collaboration among jurisdictions, leveraging learnings from one another through the different adopted approaches.Emerging testing where can i buy female viagra and screening technologiesThe Pan-Canadian COVID-19 Testing and Screening Guidance is designed to reflect changing risk management approaches as the pandemic conditions change. Recognizing that one size does not fit all, the Guidance is also designed to respond to a significant increase in the need to access testing and screening technologies.

Scaling to meet increased and sustained testing and screening demand will require a paradigm shift, broadening the technologies that are used in a manner that is tailored to the purpose and application of technologies in a variety of settings. Although PCR where can i buy female viagra remains the gold standard in diagnostic testing, numerous technologies and testing modalities are emerging that could serve to supplement diagnostic testing. These recent testing and sampling options could create opportunities to expand the approach to testing by including broad-based approaches to screening through less sensitive and potentially more cost-effective technologies, thereby alleviating strain on the overall public health system.While they can be less sensitive, these technologies could have multiple benefits including ease and reduced cost of production, improved efficiency and reduced reliance on PCR testing supplies. They also have the potential to be where can i buy female viagra less invasive depending on the technology.

Antigen and extraction-free nucleic acid testing are examples of such technologies that, in addition to being more cost-effective and easier to produce, are also easily adaptable to mobile, rapid applications. However, due to their lower sensitivity than current PCR technology, these emerging technologies may be better used as a part of screening, in conjunction with repeated testing in some settings. Recognizing that these novel technologies have lower sensitivity and specificity than current PCR technology, where can i buy female viagra their use should be targeted to scenarios where both positive and negative are interpreted and acted upon appropriately.Complementing the deployment of these emerging technologies, techniques such as pooled testing are being used to contribute to the preservation of testing resources. Governments are also tapping non-traditional data sources to complement case data.

For example, data for wastewater testing could complement COVID-19 surveillance systems by providing readily accessible pooled community samples and data for communities where testing is not available or underutilized.As of September 29, Health Canada has authorized 36 COVID-19 testing devices (PCR and serological). Health Canada is fast-tracking the review of submissions related to antigen and nucleic acid tests where can i buy female viagra. Submissions that are reviewed include various sample types, including saliva. Consult the list of authorized medical devices for uses related to COVID-19.In anticipation of regulatory approval for antigen tests, an Interim Guidance on Antigen Testing has been developed to outline potential scenarios such as routine outbreak monitoring, monitoring in different situations including high-risk settings (for example, long-term care facilities) and possible adaptation into mobile, rapid testing in rural and remote communities.Pan-Canadian COVID-19 Testing and Screening GuidanceLike the Laboratory Testing Guidance, the Pan-Canadian COVID-19 Testing and Screening Guidance (“Guidance”) is based on new public health evidence and emerging technologies, while adopting a broadened approach that leverages and tailors technologies to appropriate where can i buy female viagra uses.

The Guidance is designed to protect and expand the resilience of federal, provincial and territorial testing and screening capacity.The Guidance is based on a portfolio approach that uses different types of testing technologies for various purposes (diagnostic, screening, surveillance). The intent of the Guidance is to better use testing resources to target the most relevant test in particular situations or use cases to address specific problems or purposes. Figure 1 where can i buy female viagra. Technology streams of Pan-Canadian COVID-19 Testing and Screening Guidance Figure 1.

Technology streams of Pan-Canadian COVID-19 Testing and Screening Guidance - Text equivalent Testing. Definitive diagnosis of COVID-19 with high sensitivity PCR-based tests, with potential refinements to specimen collecting modalities where can i buy female viagra (for example, saliva) Less amenable to high frequency conduct due to greater resource utilization Screening. Indicative of COVID-19 status, with lower sensitivity Typically newer, rapid technology approaches Amenable to higher frequency repetition and more easily scalable Surveillance. Use of traditional and non-traditional data sources where can i buy female viagra to complement case data Wastewater surveillance complements conventional COVID-19 surveillance systems by providing.

efficient pooled community sample data for communities where timely clinical testing is underutilized or unavailable data at the local level Five key foundational, interrelated pillars support the advancement of the Guidance. Scientific integrity regulatory excellence proactive procurement robust data and capacity strategic communication and partnershipsUpdates to laboratory testing and antigen testing guidance founded on rigorous scientific integrity enable and inform decision-making on testing allocations within Canada, and support jurisdictions in the timely use of emerging technologies once regulatory approval is received. Regulatory excellence is equally important as a foundational pillar to implementing the Guidance in a manner that allows for where can i buy female viagra rapid approvals while still preserving the scientific integrity of the process.In addition, undertaking a proactive procurement approach ensures steady access to equipment and supplies for testing and screening. Governments continue to take a proactive procurement approach, purchasing whenever possible, contingent on regulatory approvals.Timely and comprehensive data is critical, underpinning decision-making by governments.

Governments have established a new data set for COVID-19 cases that provides more targeted information, improving the ability to understand whether infections are acquired via domestic or international travel, or if they are linked to a known outbreak. Race and ethnicity indicators have been added as well as greater information on health care workers, allowing where can i buy female viagra a better understanding of the COVID-19 experience among different population groups. In addition to the case data, key data on turnaround times for testing and contact tracing, for example, can also help identify issues related to capacity and timeliness of interventions.Finally, in addition to strong federal, provincial and territorial partnerships, relationships are being further enhanced with key partners in industry and the scientific community. While ensuring rapid and effective progress is where can i buy female viagra critical, it is also important to communicate what we know, what we are doing and what we are going to do.

This collaboration and transparency supports critical decisions, including what additional capacity may be required as part of the Guidance, for instance, federal surge capacity to supplement provincial and territorial leadership. Strategic communications and partnerships are critical to maintaining and strengthening the confidence of Canadians in Governments' actions to address COVID-19. Implementation plan of the Pan-Canadian COVID-19 where can i buy female viagra Testing and Screening Guidance. Updated Guidance Scientific integrity Regulatory excellence Proactive procurement Robust data and capacity Strategic communications and partnerships Regularly updated public health advice as science evolves Updated national lab testing indication guidance Interim antigen testing guidance Guidance on sample types Prioritized, timely review of emerging and promising technologies Responsive to testing, screening and surveillance developments Founded in and driven by scientific excellence Linking regulatory pipeline with production capacity Prioritizing made in Canada solutions Advance purchasing of promising technologies Surge capacity through full value chain and timely, comprehensive data Improving national performance data (turnaround times) Surge capacity for sample collection, lab testing contact tracing Working closely with key partners FPT.

Enables agile responses to emerging issues Industry. Linking public health and workforce requirements Tapping emerging tech Public education/understanding Looking forwardThe Guidance is expected to evolve as the state of knowledge and risk management strategies continue to where can i buy female viagra develop. Guidance on sample types is expected to be finalized during the fall and the balance of testing and screening technologies will be adjusted to respond to the needs of various populations. Researchers and companies continue to innovate and develop where can i buy female viagra new technologies and solutions.

Guidance will need to keep pace with, and take advantage of, these innovations. The continuous updating of this Guidance will rely on strong federal, provincial and territorial partnerships and collaboration leveraging key governance bodies, including the Special Advisory Committee. The Guidance will also capitalize on opportunities to leverage input and the capacity to mobilize knowledge in Canada and from around the world.Related linksOn this page Purpose and backgroundThe purpose of this notice is to communicate minimum where can i buy female viagra values of sensitivity for COVID-19 antigen testing devices.Health Canada refers to guidance published by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on antigen detecting tests.

This guidance outlines the requirements that these products must meet. This document where can i buy female viagra addresses only sensitivity for antigen tests. It complements the published FDA guidance.Sensitivity is technically a measure of the accuracy of a test against a reference standard. No such standard exists at this time, therefore the accuracy of the positive results from a test where can i buy female viagra is currently expressed as the positive percent agreement (PPA).

The term sensitivity is used throughout this document in place of PPA for ease of reading. Sensitivity is the proportion of subjects with the target condition in whom the test is positiveIt is an important measure to determine whether test information is useful and reliable.Minimum value for sensitivity Health Canada does not usually set minimum standards for sensitivity. Normally we review the submitted data where can i buy female viagra to determine whether a test performs to the standard claimed by the manufacturer. We then compare that to the standard claimed by similar tests.

However, the COVID-19 pandemic is a unique public health crisis. For this reason, where can i buy female viagra we are taking a different approach.We have set minimum standards for sensitivity that a COVID-19 antigen test must meet in order for us to consider it for authorization. Tests with sensitivity below this minimum do not meet the criteria of 5(c) and (d) of the interim order on the importation and sale of medical devices for use in relation to COVID-19. For this reason, they will not where can i buy female viagra be authorized.Health Canada considers the following to be unacceptable for authorization.

Sensitivity below 80% Sensitivity values below this level will produce too many false negative results. These tests will not be authorized, regardless of other factors.Future considerationsHealth Canada’s target value aligns with the FDA target. However, as more research results become available, we may revise this value accordingly.Health Canada welcomes applications for technologies that meet or exceed the minimum limit value. We will continue to monitor emerging science and international experience to determine whether we need to amend this value.Contact usPlease email your questions or comments about this notice to.

Hc.meddevices-instrumentsmed.sc@canada.ca.Related Links.

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The Center for Clinical Standards where is better to buy viagra and Quality (CCSQ) is responsible for administering appropriate information systems so that the public can submit healthcare-related information. While beneficiaries ultimately benefit, the primary users of (CIPST) are healthcare facility employees and contractors. They are responsible for the collection and submission of appropriate beneficiary data to CMS to receive merit-based compensation.

The generic clearance where is better to buy viagra will allow a rapid response to inform CMS initiatives using a mixture of qualitative and quantitative consumer research strategies (including formative research studies and methodological tests) to improve information systems that serve CMS audiences. CMS implements human-centered methods and activities for the improvement of policies, services, and products. As information systems and technologies are developed or improved upon, they can be tested and evaluated for end-user feedback regarding utility, usability, and desirability.

The overall goal is to apply a human-centered engagement model to maximize the where is better to buy viagra extent to which CMS CIPST product teams can gather ongoing feedback from consumers. Feedback helps engineers and designers arrive at better solutions, therefore minimizing the burden on consumers and meeting their needs and goals. The activities under this clearance involve voluntary engagement with target CIPST users to receive design and research feedback.

Voluntary end-users from samples of self-selected customers, as well as convenience samples, where is better to buy viagra with respondents selected either to cover a broad range of customers or to include specific characteristics related to certain products or services. All collection of information under this clearance is for use in both quantitative and qualitative groups collecting data related to human-computer interactions with information system development. We will use the findings to create the highest possible public benefit.

Form Number where is better to buy viagra. CMS-10706 (OMB control number. 0938-NEW).

Individuals and Private Sector (Business or other for-profit and Not-for-profit institutions). Number of Respondents. 11,476.

Total Annual Responses. 11,476. Total Annual Hours.

4,957. (For policy questions regarding this collection contact Stephanie Ray at 410-786-0971). 3.

Type of Information Collection Request. New information collection. Title of Information Collection.

Pharmacy Benefit Manager Transparency. Use. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Pub.

L. 111-148) and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (Pub. L.

111-152) (collectively, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA)) were signed into law in 2010. The PPACA established competitive private health insurance markets, called Marketplaces or Exchanges, which give millions of Americans and small businesses access to qualified health plans (QHPs), including stand-alone dental plans Start Printed Page 56229(SADPs)—private health and dental insurance plans that are certified as meeting certain standards. The PPACA added section 1150A of the Social Security Act, which requires pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) to report prescription benefit information to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

PBMs are third-party administrators of prescription programs for a variety of types of health plans, including QHPs. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) files this information collection request (ICR) in connection with the prescription benefit information that PBMs must provide to HHS under section 1150A. The burden estimate for this ICR reflects the time and effort for PBMs to submit the information regarding PBMs and prescription drugs.

Form Number. CMS-10725 (OMB control number. 0938-NEW).

Private Sector (business or other for-profits), Number of Respondents. 40. Number of Responses.

For questions regarding this collection contact Ken Buerger at 410-786-1190. 4. Type of Information Collection Request.

New Collection. Title of Information Collection. Value in Opioid Use Disorder Treatment Demonstration.

Use. Value in Opioid Use Disorder Treatment (Value in Treatment) is a 4-year demonstration program authorized under section 1866F of the Social Security Act (Act), which was added by section 6042 of the Substance Use-Disorder Prevention that Promotes Opioid Recovery and Treatment for Patients and Communities Act (SUPPORT Act). The purpose of Value in Treatment, as stated in the statute, is to “increase access of applicable beneficiaries to opioid use disorder treatment services, improve physical and mental health outcomes for such beneficiaries, and to the extent possible, reduce Medicare program expenditures.” As required by statute, Value in Treatment will be implemented no later than January 1, 2021.

Section 1866F(c)(1)(A)(ii) specifies that individuals and entities must apply for and be selected to participate in the Value in Treatment demonstration pursuant to an application and selection process established by the Secretary. Section 1866F(c)(2)(B)(iii) specifies that in order to receive CMF and performance-based incentive payments under the Value in Treatment program, each participant shall report data necessary to. Monitor and evaluate the Value in Treatment program.

Determine if criteria are met. And determine the performance-based incentive payment. Form Number.

CMS-10728 (OMB control number. 0938-New). Frequency.

Yearly. Affected Public. Individuals and Households.

Number of Respondents. 12,096. Total Annual Responses.

(For policy questions regarding this collection contact Rebecca VanAmburg at 410-786-0524.) Start Signature Dated. September 8, 2020. William N.

Parham, III, Director, Paperwork Reduction Staff, Office of Strategic Operations and Regulatory Affairs.

The Center for Clinical Standards and Quality (CCSQ) is responsible for where can i buy female viagra administering appropriate information systems so that the public can submit healthcare-related information. While beneficiaries ultimately benefit, the primary users of (CIPST) are healthcare facility employees and contractors. They are responsible for the collection and submission of appropriate beneficiary data to CMS to receive merit-based compensation.

The generic clearance where can i buy female viagra will allow a rapid response to inform CMS initiatives using a mixture of qualitative and quantitative consumer research strategies (including formative research studies and methodological tests) to improve information systems that serve CMS audiences. CMS implements human-centered methods and activities for the improvement of policies, services, and products. As information systems and technologies are developed or improved upon, they can be tested and evaluated for end-user feedback regarding utility, usability, and desirability.

The overall goal is to apply a human-centered engagement model to maximize the where can i buy female viagra extent to which CMS CIPST product teams can gather ongoing feedback from consumers. Feedback helps engineers and designers arrive at better solutions, therefore minimizing the burden on consumers and meeting their needs and goals. The activities under this clearance involve voluntary engagement with target CIPST users to receive design and research feedback.

Voluntary end-users from samples of self-selected customers, as well as convenience samples, with respondents selected either to cover a broad range of customers or to include specific where can i buy female viagra characteristics related to certain products or services. All collection of information under this clearance is for use in both quantitative and qualitative groups collecting data related to human-computer interactions with information system development. We will use the findings to create the highest possible public benefit.

Form Number where can i buy female viagra. CMS-10706 (OMB control number. 0938-NEW).

Individuals and Private Sector (Business or other for-profit and Not-for-profit institutions). Number of Respondents. 11,476.

Total Annual Responses. 11,476. Total Annual Hours.

4,957. (For policy questions regarding this collection contact Stephanie Ray at 410-786-0971). 3.

Type of Information Collection Request. New information collection. Title of Information Collection.

Pharmacy Benefit Manager Transparency. Use. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Pub.

L. 111-148) and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (Pub. L.

111-152) (collectively, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA)) were signed into law in 2010. The PPACA established competitive private health insurance markets, called Marketplaces or Exchanges, which give millions of Americans and small businesses access to qualified health plans (QHPs), including stand-alone dental plans Start Printed Page 56229(SADPs)—private health and dental insurance plans that are certified as meeting certain standards. The PPACA added section 1150A of the Social Security Act, which requires pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) to report prescription benefit information to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

PBMs are third-party administrators of prescription programs for a variety of types of health plans, including QHPs. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) files this information collection request (ICR) in connection with the prescription benefit information that PBMs must provide to HHS under section 1150A. The burden estimate for this ICR reflects the time and effort for PBMs to submit the information regarding PBMs and prescription drugs.

Form Number. CMS-10725 (OMB control number. 0938-NEW).

Private Sector (business or other for-profits), Number of Respondents. 40. Number of Responses.

For questions regarding this collection contact Ken Buerger at 410-786-1190. 4. Type of Information Collection Request.

New Collection. Title of Information Collection. Value in Opioid Use Disorder Treatment Demonstration.

Use. Value in Opioid Use Disorder Treatment (Value in Treatment) is a 4-year demonstration program authorized under section 1866F of the Social Security Act (Act), which was added by section 6042 of the Substance Use-Disorder Prevention that Promotes Opioid Recovery and Treatment for Patients and Communities Act (SUPPORT Act). The purpose of Value in Treatment, as stated in the statute, is to “increase access of applicable beneficiaries to opioid use disorder treatment services, improve physical and mental health outcomes for such beneficiaries, and to the extent possible, reduce Medicare program expenditures.” As required by statute, Value in Treatment will be implemented no later than January 1, 2021.

Section 1866F(c)(1)(A)(ii) specifies that individuals and entities must apply for and be selected to participate in the Value in Treatment demonstration pursuant to an application and selection process established by the Secretary. Section 1866F(c)(2)(B)(iii) specifies that in order to receive CMF and performance-based incentive payments under the Value in Treatment program, each participant shall report data necessary to. Monitor and evaluate the Value in Treatment program.

Determine if criteria are met. And determine the performance-based incentive payment. Form Number.

CMS-10728 (OMB control number. 0938-New). Frequency.

Yearly. Affected Public. Individuals and Households.

Number of Respondents. 12,096. Total Annual Responses.

(For policy questions regarding this collection contact Rebecca VanAmburg at 410-786-0524.) Start Signature Dated. September 8, 2020. William N.

Parham, III, Director, Paperwork Reduction Staff, Office of Strategic Operations and Regulatory Affairs.

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Scott Gottlieb, can you take viagra every day former Commissioner of the FDAAdam Jeffery | CNBCDr. Scott Gottlieb, former FDA chief under President Donald Trump, said on Sunday that the new guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to not test asymptomatic people for Covid-19 was "unfortunate" because those people could be at high risk of contracting the infection. "We should be testing those people to make sure they haven't become infected and aren't asymptomatic carriers because we know that they can spread the infection," Gottlieb said in an interview on CBS' "Face the Nation." "They're less likely to spread the infection, but they can still spread the infection."Earlier this month, the CDC quietly revised its guidance on coronavirus testing and dropped its previous recommendation to test can you take viagra every day everyone who has come into close contact with an infected person, even those who don't have symptoms.The move drew immediate criticism from medical groups and allegations of political motivation. Two federal health officials reportedly said the CDC was pressured into changing the guidance by top officials at the White House and Department of Health and Human Services.Medical experts and lawmakers say that early and widespread testing of people without symptoms can help mitigate the spread of the virus. Gottlieb said that can you take viagra every day one reason for the CDC's decision could be that businesses were requiring people to test negative for the virus before they can return to work.

He said he doesn't think the new guidance will likely be followed by states. "If that's the case and that was a concern, there can you take viagra every day were more targeted ways to address that and speak to that problem, as opposed to making this very broad, sweeping change in the recommendations, which I think could be misinterpreted by the general public and certainly by public health agencies within states," Gottlieb said. "And so I don't think this changed guidance is likely to be followed by many states." "I think it's prudent that we test people who might be at high risk of contracting the infection," Gottlieb added. — CNBC's Will Feuer contributed reporting.

Scott Gottlieb, where can i buy female viagra former Commissioner of the FDAAdam Jeffery | CNBCDr. Scott Gottlieb, former FDA chief under President Donald Trump, said on Sunday that the new guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to not test asymptomatic people for Covid-19 was "unfortunate" because those people could be at high risk of contracting the infection. "We should be testing where can i buy female viagra those people to make sure they haven't become infected and aren't asymptomatic carriers because we know that they can spread the infection," Gottlieb said in an interview on CBS' "Face the Nation." "They're less likely to spread the infection, but they can still spread the infection."Earlier this month, the CDC quietly revised its guidance on coronavirus testing and dropped its previous recommendation to test everyone who has come into close contact with an infected person, even those who don't have symptoms.The move drew immediate criticism from medical groups and allegations of political motivation.

Two federal health officials reportedly said the CDC was pressured into changing the guidance by top officials at the White House and Department of Health and Human Services.Medical experts and lawmakers say that early and widespread testing of people without symptoms can help mitigate the spread of the virus. Gottlieb said that one reason for the CDC's decision could be that businesses were requiring people to test negative for where can i buy female viagra the virus before they can return to work. He said he doesn't think the new guidance will likely be followed by states.

"If that's the case and that was a concern, there were more targeted ways to address that and speak to that problem, as opposed to where can i buy female viagra making this very broad, sweeping change in the recommendations, which I think could be misinterpreted by the general public and certainly by public health agencies within states," Gottlieb said. "And so I don't think this changed guidance is likely to be followed by many states." "I think it's prudent that we test people who might be at high risk of contracting the infection," Gottlieb added. — CNBC's Will Feuer contributed reporting.